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issue Phenotype off for a single pepper - why?

Hi all,

my first real post on this forum. Been growing peppers for some 15 years or so, but only as a hobby and not too seriously.
 
I have a Scotch Bonnet plant about 5 years old, grown from a seed taken from a pepper I bought in a supermarket in London. the plant is crazy prolific, producing tons of red fruit.
On one branch I have a single fruit that is distinctly different. It is fully ripe but the color is more yellow-orange-ish than all other fruits. It is striking; it is not just an unripe color. There are several fruits on the same branch coming along fine in the red color.
 
A single pepper standing out on a plant goes a bit against my understanding of genetics, genotypes and phenotypes. If there is cross-pollination (and I am sure they may be some as I am taking no partciular precautions to prevent it) it should not change the fruit phenotype on the original plant; it would only be in F1 and onwards I'd potentially expect a different phenotype.
So, what might account for this phenomenon?

In perspective I think I recall that Red Savina was grown from a single seed off a pepper that was also a bit different from the rest of the fruit on a classical orange hab plant that was header for the shredder. I could be wrong, though. So the phenomenon is nothing new, I just don't quite understand it.

Thanks all.
C.
 
 

The_NorthEast_ChileMan

Extreme Member
ChewbaccaTums said:
In perspective I think I recall that Red Savina was grown from a single seed off a pepper that was also a bit different from the rest of the fruit on a classical orange hab plant that was header for the shredder. I could be wrong, though. So the phenomenon is nothing new, I just don't quite understand it.

Thanks all.
 
It's funny how a "myth" forms around a hallowed variety.  The original "story" I remember reading many moons ago was the same as this Cayenne Diane version:

The story goes that Frank was plowing under a large field of orange Habaneros after his buyer withdrew his proposed buying price, rather than sell them at a lower price. While plowing the crop, he spotted one strange red fruited plant among the regular orange habaneros. He saved this one mutant plant and through selective breeding, the Red Savina strain was developed.

?Except for the selective breeding? So this site reports

Credit for the development of the Red Savina™ is usually given to Frank Garcia, who protected his unique cultivar with a designation under the Plant Variety Protection Act in the United States when he perfected this varietal. The breeding method used by Garcia is not known, but it is assumed that he crossed increasingly hotter cultivars of peppers with each other to achieve to monumental heat of the Red Savina™.

Aaaaahhhhhh - If the Red Savina was so much hotter than the Yellow Habanero (The two hottest peppers known at the time.) - how can there be "increasing hotter cultivars" to cross it with?
 
 My advice is to take many of these myths with a grain or two of salt and the skepticism they deserve. 
_
 

The_NorthEast_ChileMan

Extreme Member
Demented said:
Legend has it, he had access to Ed's secret unground Pepper X grow laboratory back in the day.
 
102583364-facepalm-statue-in-paris-france.jpg

 
 
Facts have it the Red Savina Until 2011, it was protected by the U.S. Plant Variety Protection Act (PVP #9200255) so if The term of protection runs 20 years from the certificate's date of issue  Frank Garcia got PVP in 1991, right? and the Red Savina held the Guinness World Recordrecord from 1994-2006.  right? Where was Ed's secret lab in the late 80's to mid 90's?
 
 I'm not trying to be an A-hole, well maybe a little, but I have read so many of these factoids about so many different peppers (Remember Dragon's Breath?) that  we just take them with a grain of salt and a 
 
Picard-Facepalm.jpg

 
 
 
Offa da soapbox!
 
The_NorthEast_ChileMan said:
 
102583364-facepalm-statue-in-paris-france.jpg

 
 
Facts have it the Red Savina Until 2011, it was protected by the U.S. Plant Variety Protection Act (PVP #9200255) so if The term of protection runs 20 years from the certificate's date of issue  Frank Garcia got PVP in 1991, right? and the Red Savina held the Guinness World Recordrecord from 1994-2006.  right? Where was Ed's secret lab in the late 80's to mid 90's?
 
 I'm not trying to be an A-hole, well maybe a little, but I have read so many of these factoids about so many different peppers (Remember Dragon's Breath?) that  we just take them with a grain of salt and a 
 
Picard-Facepalm.jpg

 
 
 
Offa da soapbox!
Sarcasm doesn't translate to text very well.
 
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