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sun Plants in full sun throughout the day

Quick question. Temperatures here usually top around 30°C (85°F) at this time of year. I can place my pepper plants so that they get full sun from 6:30 AM to 5:00 PM (approximating, might be less than this). So should I? Are there things to worry about, like UV and whatnot? Cheers.
 
1. Harden them off slowly at first. Put them out but in shade then gradually move them on to sunny parts. They need to get used to full sun.
 
2. Or put them out in full sun but watch them - if they start drooping, move them to shaded area.
 
I would also suggest moving just a couple for a few days and see how they do - that way if they aren't ready for it or get too much you only risk a couple plants and not the entire grow !
 
JDFan said:
I would also suggest moving just a couple for a few days and see how they do - that way if they aren't ready for it or get too much you only risk a couple plants and not the entire grow !
 

What JDfan said is right on.  Want to add its by variety.  Over the years, my hardening off process has gone from complicated as hell to stick them in indirect sunlight and the let them be.  After a week, I will start putting some out.  Have figured out that some want at least two weeks. 
 

cone9

Extreme Member
bongcloud said:
Quick question. Temperatures here usually top around 30°C (85°F) at this time of year. I can place my pepper plants so that they get full sun from 6:30 AM to 5:00 PM (approximating, might be less than this). So should I? Are there things to worry about, like UV and whatnot? Cheers.
I think what you are asking is if it is OK to plant them in an area with full sun all day long.
 
After they are acclimated, as per the suggestions above, it is find for them to be in full sun all day.  Some varieties, like C. pubescens, may do best with some scattered sun for part of the day.  In general I think they prefer a slightly cooler environment.
 
Hawaiianero said:
Try to find a way to block direct midday sun. From 11 til 2 at least. Shadecloth, corner of the house shadow or tree. Anything helps.
 
So it's best to avoid midday sun? That was mostly what my original question was about, but perhaps I've phrased it poorly. Pretty much the only thing I can do is put it in complete shadow around those hours, everything else would be too much of a hassle for my circumstances. So is no direct sunlight better than full sunlight in these hours?
 
I think that last question is going to be a regional one.  In Kentucky, I've only had some minor problems with things like Star of Turkey.  Most of that is burnt pods during July.  But I know folk in Florida who say they absolutely need shade cloth.  That said, my seed stock plants get shaded with agricultural bridal cloth and the plastic on the high tunnel is three years old and starting to turn white.  Neither seem to slow growth.  So maybe shading is the way to go if you can because it doesnt seem to harm a thing.

 
 

cone9

Extreme Member
Given your elevation and latitude, (712 ft & 44.77) I see no reason the mid day sun should bother your peppers at all once they are acclimated to being outside.  Make sure they don't dry too much on the really hot days.
 
I give mine as much sun as I can (880 ft & 40.52).
 
I have had mine in partial sun until 1130am, then full until dusk.  No problems yet, but I just bought some 30% shade cloth to help them.  It will be providing shade until 5pm, then full until dusk. Right now the high temps are in the 90's, and 80's at night. 
 
I am in SW Spain, and the sun and heat here are brutal. When I started growing, my main concern was to give the plants as much sun as possible. Now, my main concern is actually to protect my plants from the sun. (I am growing "on the roof" where there is basically direct sun, all day long, and temps and sun is crazy basically all year long). Sun Shade IS A MUST here. I placed an approx. 6x4' shade that way so it protects my grow spot in the biggest heat of the day.

For hardening, from the greenhouse to up on the roof, I put them for a week in a more shadier spot, and then move them to the area under the shade. Not sure what percentage that shade is, possibly 30-50%
 
Not saying climate change is man made, but I do think eventually we will all need shade cloth.  Just seems like if something is not changing, then why would plants which were initially grown closer to the equator now need shade cloth in places like Florida.
 
AJ Drew said:
Not saying climate change is man made, but I do think eventually we will all need shade cloth.  Just seems like if something is not changing, then why would plants which were initially grown closer to the equator now need shade cloth in places like Florida.
I feel like if it gets to that point then we'll need to aide in natural selection.
 
I have no idea but i have jalapenos that sit in full sun all day and love it. I get great production. I have also had chinenses that come from a hotter climate than mine and do way better with some shade. The plants look fine they just drop lots of flowers and pod production suffers a great deal. I also had better luck with lemon drops and aji cito in full sun. A few pods get burnt but i get tons of pods.
 
Today i put my best mini red rocoto behind some lattice with roughly 2-3" squares in it. Flowers just started to open and im not taking any chances. It will still get a little full sun but not nearly as much as it was getting.
 
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