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hot-sauce Sriracha sauce shortage

Yea, this has made the late show comedy circuit news segments since late last week. I forget which Jimmy was concerned his half used bottle he's had for 2 years would run out before production is resumed.
 

Siv

Extreme Member
No problem here...

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Downriver

Extreme Member
Homemade Sriracha by Joshua Bousel

About This Recipe

Yield: Makes 1 1/2 cups

Active time: 15 minutes

Total time: 5-7 Days

This recipe appears in: How to Make Sriracha from Scratch

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs red jalalpeños, stems snipped off, leaving green tops intact

6 cloves garlic, peeled

4 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 tablespoon Kosher salt

1/2 cup distilled white vinegar

Procedures

1) Place jalalpeños, garlic, sugar, and salt in bowl of a food processor fitting with steel blade. Pulse until chilies are very finely chopped, stopping to scrap sides of bowl as necessary. Transfer mixture to a clean jar, cover, and let sit at room temperature.

2) Check jar each day for fermentation, when little bubbles start forming at bottom of jar, about 3-5 days. Stir contents each day, continuing to let ferment until chilies are no longer rising in volume, an additional 2-3 days.

3) Transfer chilies to jar of a blender, add in white vinegar, and puree until completely smooth, 1-3 minutes. Transfer to a mesh strainer set atop of a medium saucepan. Strain mixture into saucepan, using a rubber spatula to push trough as much pulp as possible, only seeded and larger pieces of chilies should remain in strainer.

4) Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until sauce thickens and clings to a spoon, 5 or 10 minutes. Transfer to an airtight container and store in refrigerator for up to 6 months.
 

skullbiker

Extreme Member
Homemade Sriracha by Joshua Bousel

About This Recipe

Yield: Makes 1 1/2 cups

Active time: 15 minutes

Total time: 5-7 Days

This recipe appears in: How to Make Sriracha from Scratch

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs red jalalpeños, stems snipped off, leaving green tops intact

6 cloves garlic, peeled

4 tablespoons light brown sugar

1 tablespoon Kosher salt

1/2 cup distilled white vinegar

Procedures

1) Place jalalpeños, garlic, sugar, and salt in bowl of a food processor fitting with steel blade. Pulse until chilies are very finely chopped, stopping to scrap sides of bowl as necessary. Transfer mixture to a clean jar, cover, and let sit at room temperature.

2) Check jar each day for fermentation, when little bubbles start forming at bottom of jar, about 3-5 days. Stir contents each day, continuing to let ferment until chilies are no longer rising in volume, an additional 2-3 days.

3) Transfer chilies to jar of a blender, add in white vinegar, and puree until completely smooth, 1-3 minutes. Transfer to a mesh strainer set atop of a medium saucepan. Strain mixture into saucepan, using a rubber spatula to push trough as much pulp as possible, only seeded and larger pieces of chilies should remain in strainer.

4) Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until sauce thickens and clings to a spoon, 5 or 10 minutes. Transfer to an airtight container and store in refrigerator for up to 6 months.
This is fairly close to every chili ferment recipe I do except I rarely put vinegar in and generally add honey in near the end of the cook(as in Sweet Sriracha).
 

Downriver

Extreme Member
This is fairly close to every chili ferment recipe I do except I rarely put vinegar in and generally add honey in near the end of the cook(as in Sweet Sriracha).

Yepper. I fiddle with it a bit myself, but I found it to be a good base recipe and produces a decent product as is.
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
Those all look great! Sriracha isn't fermented so it should even be easier to recreate. I've seen factory tour videos where as soon as the mash is produced it is stored with vinegar in blue barrels. The mash is then used for the chili sauce and sambal jarred products and Sriracha.
 

salsalady

Business Member
Oh yeah, I have several gallons of that recipe fermenting now. Some were started in July of 1920. No shortage here! 😋

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Wow! That looks pretty good for 122 years old! ;) :lol:


I've heard it described as aged instead of fermented. 🤷 the taste to me has kind of a fermented flavor which i dont particularly care for. Good thing i am stocked up on as many bottles as i will need in the near (or far) future......0.
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
I've heard it described as aged instead of fermented.
Pretty much.
"Ground chilies, salt and vinegar help form the base sauce that fills blue 55-gallon drums that must last until next year’s grinding season. The base also contributes to the company’s two lesser-known sauces: Chili Garlic and Sambal Oelek."
 

Uncle Eckley

Extreme Member
Oops! Time for this one.

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Yikes! I've only got a few left!!

So, of course the self-important monkey species on this benighted little planet has continued from the last several centuries its theme of fucking everything up. Heatwaves, superstorms, droughts, rising seas, dwindling resources, political upheaval and such we take in stride, because, like all children, we believe we're invincible. But a Sriracha shortage? That shit is terrifying. As pepper people, most of us here will manage, but can you imagine the horror felt by ordinary folk?
 
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salsalady

Business Member
One recipe i did that I think turned out awesome was.....

I did a ferment of red jalapeno, garlic, onion, salt....It fermented for ...I Think....60 days.

Then I took the same amount of FRESH red jalapeno, garlic, onion as was used in the original ferment, mixed with the ferment, blendered the snot out of it, cooked and bottled.

I may have used some red bell peppers to bulk it up and cut a but of heat....i can't remember...

That sauce was really good. Not a heavy ferment flavor, a bit bright from the fresh. Beautiful bright red color....
 
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