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chinense The Arava Scorpion

Today I took a trip down to the south of Israel to Eilat. On the way, I stopped by Moshav Ein Yahav, where Kobi Ziv Av breeds and grows the Arava Scorpion. I managed to pick up a sack of dried peppers of 50 or 60 grams for 25 shekels from Kob Ziv Av himself. According to some stuff on the internet, people are saying it's a cross between the Ghost Pepper and the Trinidad Scorpion. Contrary to what I've read, I believe he said it was a cross between a red habanero and a lantern habanero, if I understood correctly. The claim is it is somewhere between 800,000 - 1,000,000 scoville units. If this be the case, I might have gotten a weaker one. Personally, I did not find it to be on par with the Ghost Pepper for heat. Still, a nice burn, though. I've eaten two so far and they both have had varying heats. The first one was a tiny one and about as hot as a mild habanero where as the second was a fairly hot habanero. The burn was mostly in the back of my mouth and lasted about 10 minutes for the intense part and another 10 or 15 to dwindle down to baseline.
 
As for flavor, it's kind of hard to give it a fair rating as it was dried and I think they lose their complexity when they're dry. It was very tasty, though. It had a fruity back taste to it after the dried flavor went away. I would describe it as somewhat between a cherry and blueberry. At first I wasn't sure as to the flavor since I'd eaten a piece of blueberry cheesecake before hand. So, I cleaned out my mouth properly and waited some time to eat another... and sure enough, it was berry like. For habaneros, it was one of the better tasting ones I've tasted dry. All in all, I like it. Whenever the seeds hit the market, I say go for it! It's definitely got good flavor and a nice heat.
 
I'll try and get better pictures when I have a better camera to use. Right now, I just have my laptop webcam and I'm in a hotel with sub par lighting for photography. So, I'll keep you all posted. If I have the chance, I'll return to take some pictures of the set up. Due to the heavy rains and flooding in the area, the plants weren't so accessible. Also, I'll try and clarify a few things about it. I'm still not 100% clear on a few details about the cross. My Hebrew is only so-so when it comes to discussing plant breeding and things like that.
 
Here's a link I came across to tell you a bit more:
 
http://www.peppersbymail.com/arava-scorpion-new-pepper-israel/
 
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Again, sorry for the bad pics. I'll post better ones when I've got the time.

 
 
Very interesting- thanks so much for posting this! ;) 
 
I had not even heard about this pepper/cross until now! Always intriguing/exciting to learn about what's going on with peppers in other places around the world- especially the Holy Land!
 
The flavor notes having a berry like taste is what really interests me. It's always nice to find a pepper that has very tasty qualities coupled with a heat that is not to hot so that one could just eat & snack on one whenever they may wish- without having their face melt, or having to prepare beforehand for the ensuing heat!  
 
I'd definitely be interested in any further info/pics, etc...  :P  Shalom!
 
Yeah, it's not on the market yet. He's still working on stabilizing it, I think. We'll have to wait and see. I'll ask him next time when he plans on releasing seeds to the public. If he's okay with it, I might grow some out. I doubt he'd mind, but, always best to ask first. I think he's been working on it for a few years now.
 
Yes, very interesting.
 
But, if it is a cross between two Habanero varieties, where does the 'Scorpion' come in?
 
alkhall said:
Yes, very interesting.
 
But, if it is a cross between two Habanero varieties, where does the 'Scorpion' come in?
 
I think it's mostly a catchy name, to be honest. I suppose the idea was to reflect that it stings your mouth? I mean, given the region and wildlife, I can see where he gets it. I'll ask him next time I see him if I can remember.
 
yochannontzvi said:
 
I think it's mostly a catchy name, to be honest. I suppose the idea was to reflect that it stings your mouth? I mean, given the region and wildlife, I can see where he gets it. I'll ask him next time I see him if I can remember.
 
OK, it is just that I am used to the 'Scorpion' referring to the 'stinger' tail on the pod.
 
That is quite a interesting cross, but I just see a pointy tail and not the tail like the Scorpions from Trinidad area.  The red hab. and the Lantern habanero  aren't really that hot when you put them next to the ghost pepper or the Trinidad red scorpion but the weather can make a big difference especially like the wet weather we got here in Missouri USA this year it was one of the wettest and coolest in a long time and most of my super hots were not so supper hot compared to last year when it was very dry and summer temps in the 100 plus mark.
The berry like flavor would make a tasty hot pepper,  most habs like the red hab. reminds me of apricots with a strong floral flavor that wants to dominate any food you put it in.     
 
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