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chinense The best tasting non-hot C.chinense ever - The Aji jobito

I think this is going to be a drawback for most people growing peppers. My seeds geminated in July and just today, I saw a little yellow forming on my first pod. It won't be long now though. Nobody who grows outside, unless you are in an area that never freezes, will be able to grow these things and make pods. Kraken, I don't know if you are seeing the same thing, but the stems of this plant seem more rigid, or stronger than most. It is probably because it takes so long to grow that the cell walls are stronger. I'll be growing these same individual plants for several years, so it will be interesting to see how big of a plant I can make these into and how well they will hold up as they get bigger. Maybe some Jobito trees? Tom
 

cone9

Extreme Member
cycadjungle said:
I think this is going to be a drawback for most people growing peppers. My seeds geminated in July and just today, I saw a little yellow forming on my first pod. It won't be long now though. Nobody who grows outside, unless you are in an area that never freezes, will be able to grow these things and make pods. Kraken, I don't know if you are seeing the same thing, but the stems of this plant seem more rigid, or stronger than most. It is probably because it takes so long to grow that the cell walls are stronger. I'll be growing these same individual plants for several years, so it will be interesting to see how big of a plant I can make these into and how well they will hold up as they get bigger. Maybe some Jobito trees? Tom
 
Grow a few extra plants - it looks like you'll need to be sending these out to a whole bunch of us disappointed wannabe growers up north!
 
I wonder how the other Lindberg varieties will fair outside the tropics.
 
Yea, I can see having extra plants that can be sold as they first start to flower so people up north can get pods in time. These are for sure, a two season type that people up north would have to bring inside at least for one winter just to get a decent harvest. Another attribute I am seeing that I don't see much is that I am getting bunches of sprouts at many of the lower leaf nodes and it appears they will get much thicker in time at the bottoms, where normally, bigger plants become bare and woody on the lower side of the plants.
 
cone9 said:
 
Grow a few extra plants - it looks like you'll need to be sending these out to a whole bunch of us disappointed wannabe growers up north!
 
I wonder how the other Lindberg varieties will fair outside the tropics.
Well I will let you know if any of mine grow lol. I have a few seeds of each type I got in the last order this week started.
Have you all noticed your Jobito plants being very dense? Mine are rather compact. But mine are still babies.
 
I don't want to deviate/hijack this thread, but i had a thought: since the length of time between sowing seed and harvesting ripe fruit seems unusually long, has anyone considered hybrids with a faster-fruiting C. chinense?

There are drawbacks other than compromising the flavor, such as introducing heat. The Pun1 gene is responsible for the presence of heat/capsaicinoids, and the non-hot version of this gene is recessive (the lower-case "p" in the non-hot version is a geneticist's grammar to denote its recesive nature; thus, 'Pun1' is hot, and 'pun1' is not).
That means that you won't get a non-hot hybrid until the F2 generation. It won't get quite the same flavor as Aji Jobito either, and a backcross may be needed.

Hybridizing with another non-hot chinense variety with earlier traits might simplify this, but it's still a helluva project, and i don't want to provoke a discussion on this in this thread, because it is clear that this thread should be devoted to purebred Aji Jobito... the amount of enthusiastic and informative participation here makes it the busiest thread i'm currently following!!

Developing a true-tasting Aji Jobito with an earlier harvest is a project beyond my resources, and may offend folk who wish to retain this as a heritage strain, but i just had to offer it as a suggestion.
 
There's also a quirk i've noticed with at least some annuums and chinenses; they seem to flower much sooner if both their daytime and nighttime temperatures are the same -- 75°F seems to work.
This could stunt a young plant if done too soon, but a sizable plant that's reluctant to flower might be coaxed this way.

It might be impossible to arrange this outdoors in field culture or vegetable gardens, but indoor/greenhouse arrangements seem feasible, and a few outdoor potted specimens could be brought inside every night.
Once the flowering starts, it might continue if the temperature regimen is discontinued. I don't know this, but i'd guess it's likely.
 
Well mine will be grown in pots.  I'll bring them inside if I don't get pods this summer/fall.  Mine look just like my other chinenese.
 
Thank you all for posting on this thread.  The information presented has made me decide to grow out 3 plants indoors instead of planting outside.  I'll be sure to post updates. 
 

cone9

Extreme Member
roper2008 said:
This is my prize jobito plant.  I have 5 all together.  The Jobito is on the left, and Bahamian Goat on the right.  I started the seed of Bahamian Goat 1/13/16.  The
Jobito was started 1/27/16.  The Jobito is a little bit larger.
 
 
Very nice, Linda!
My Jobito plants, started the middle of Feb, are just seedlings and not thriving.  I may need to start a couple new plants.
 
cone9 said:
 
Very nice, Linda!
My Jobito plants, started the middle of Feb, are just seedlings and not thriving.  I may need to start a couple new plants.
 
 
Thanks Dave.  I started them a couple days after you sent them to me.  They are all doing quite well.  Very much looking forward to trying them this summer.
 
Well if we are gonna show pictures...
Here is my trio of Jobitos.
 

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I am STILL waiting for a second pod to ripen... THey wer some of the first pods to form on my plants.. And other then the one ripe pod I have had other than my Yaki Blue they wold be the longest to ripen pods I have..
 
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