• If you need help identifying a pepper, disease, or plant issue, please post in Identification.

What hot peppers are easy to grow [home, growbox, air]

I know cayenne is wort of try and Lemon Drop, maybe Habanero Mustard/Gold sth like it (thick stalk).
 
What peppers (higher SHU the better) do you recommend, which ones cause the least of problems? I would prefer if it's rather common variant, available in Europe. 
My experience
Carolina Reaper - requires greenhouse and irrigating system IMO, is sensitive to pests in the air and won't grow due to temperate climate
Bhut Jolokia - sensitive to verticillium wilts, requires ventilation and large room, best desintected organic garden ground and cover
Habanero - tends to decay after beginning stage. It's possible that it grows after worst stage of sprouting when it have up to eight of leafs
Naga Jolokia - like bhut one but common dwarfism although growed in appropriate ground. It probably needs red ferralite ground. 
Growing tries (will write about stages):
  1. Third try (not much additional chemistry, but overfertilised)
  • Sprout stage - seeds on lint, no fungicide
  • Cotyledons: seedling, vermicompost + peat + universal ground + calcium
  • First leafs, plant reaching the foil: first pot, universal ground + peat + fertiliser
  • Eight leafs, before florescence: plant dies (height: up to 60cm)
      2. Today try
  • Sprout stage - seeds on lint, fungicide
  • Cotyledons: seedling, vermicompost + peat + universal ground + calcium + iron (a little) + algae + manure + sth (red ground)
  • First leafs, plant reaching the foil: first pot, "red ground" + vermicompost + green fertiliser 
  • Eight leafs: plant decays (height: up to 30cm)
      3. Next planned try at March/April/have still one plant in seedling left and Titanit stimulator
  • Sprout stage - seeds on lint, fungicide
  • Cotyledons: seedling, vermicompost + compost + calcium + fungicide + sulphur (desinfection in high temperature)
  • First leafs, plant reaching the foil: first pot, fungicide + peat + universal ground + green fertiliser + growth stimulator + sulphur
  • Eight leafs, before florescence: potassium + green fertiliser
  • Florescence: new pot, sulphur + a little algae, manure and iron
  • Crops?
I have spend ~200$, no luck however. This is as hard to grow as daturas and herbaceous plants. 
 
 
 
Wow, it sounds like you're trying just way too hard...  This sounds like a classic case of "loving your plants to death".
.
I'd really try to keep it simple, and get one good grow under your belt. Simple is a mix of peat moss or coco coir, with perlite or rice hulls, and an amendment like worm castings or biochar.
.
7 parts coco coir/peat moss
2 parts perlite/rice hulls
1 part worm castings/vermicompost/biochar
.
You could get by all season on a fish emulsion and kelp fertilizer.
.
Start seeds in pure coco coir.  Easy.
.
All that nutrient cycling and switching is witchcraft.  Peppers can literally live and thrive on a steady stream of the same nutrients for their entire life cycle, as they continuously fruit. (so long as the environment is favorable)  Contrary to what you may read, peppers do not have "veg and bloom" cycles.  They actually love a stable, steady environment.
.
Peppers are NOT hard.  They have fairly minimal requirements.  Environmental factors or over zealous caretaking kills more pepper plants than any pest or disease.
 
Okay, I have transplanted my last plant to medium size pot. I have used your formula, but I mixed also universal potting soil with one to seeding (containing coco coir + sth else), used a lot of crushed lace + hydrogel instead of perlite. Desinfecated it with sulphur in high temperature and then after some days added fertiliser of ground containing biohumus and Tytanit (stimulator of growth) + fungicide Topsin 500 mc. Generally grace period is preserved, hope evaporated sulfuric acid won't overfertilise since some of sulphur has been left in the pot from not quite half of spoon. Also I desinfecated whole room using dezacid SMC 1 and used sulphur because dasomet is too expensive. I am worried about that plant because it had 10 leafs but have lost recently 2 small ones and cotyledons. And new leaf grow only slightly... i am afraid its gonna fail soon. But anyway I have moved also my growbox to window near the heater. Without greenhouse its extremely hard to grow habanero peppers.
 
I grow indoors, and what I found that works for me at first was to put my grow lights, plants, a fan, and a germination heat mat set to 26*C / 79*F underneath a tall enough table with a table cloth big enough to cover all sides.  I usually keep my apartment temp at 19*C / 66*F year round.
 
This topic isn't exactly about growing method, I would want to know what hot peppers have highest success rate + SHU + link to legit shop (preferably amazon, ebay, allegro pl, EU delivery). 
Anyway I used substracts that I have had at hand. I haven't noticed that "sth else" in potting soil has affected my previous plant (which is dead now but after using growing stimulator still stands). So the formula is preserved I think. I don't need to use heater cuz I have preserved 28 celcius in my room. I use both led lights and growing lights to my growbox. Leafs of the previous plant has been decaying from base to brown colours. IDK if it's a disease, bacteria or just the fact in my case these don't grow. Curiously a sonflowerout of nowhere grows well on balcony... Datura haven't sprouted at all, but seeds of annual datura sprouted last year...  
Give me suggestions + names of peppers. 
 
I have got good success indoors with bhut jolokia yellow and wild eximium. My bhut jolokia loved >25°C full day growing condition. Also same goes to the eximium after two years passed it did go crazy and loving near 30°C growing conditions. It's had sluggish and slow start but after while it just shining. Bhut jolokia does not grow tall as eximium's >3 meter. Eximium is good for crossing not really usable as its current stage. Berries are black pepper sized, tasty and frutescens heat. If you have tall window put ur eximium there and will do nicely. Rocotos do well on balcony. They require cold nights/warm days. Also baccatum and baccatum x frutescens hybrids does well on balcony.
 
Indoors you should be able to grow any pepper because you control the climate. Outdoors some plants are more sensitive to cold temps etc. The Chinese peppers ( usually the hotter ones) take longer to produce which becomes an issue in many places, but indoor that is no issue. I agree with solid7, keep it simple as possible because that will help rule out issues. I would also recommend getting a scope so that you can have a close look for pests on sick plants.
 
I would love to help more, but you are rambling all over the place, and it's impossible to really understand what your issue is.  You've stated that you can't get habaneros to grow, and then put some opinion based assessments together, which sound like they're excuses for a lack of growing knowledge - I could be wrong.
.
You say that you prefer to use the substrates that you have on hand - but it sure likes like you're fiddling with them constantly.  "Week 1 do this, week 2, do something else, week 3..."   There is absolutely NO POINT in trying to optimize, if you can't even do the basics.
.
As has been said, KEEP IT SIMPLE.  You're totally overthinking this.  It is NOT hard to get habaneros to grow.  The problem isn't the peppers that you've selected, it's your fiddling.  Slow down, think a little less, do a little less, and give the plant a chance!
 
Well what I have done is one of tries that I wanted to perform, next year I will do this different ways with different peppers and see if the pepper grows or not. I will ask the sellers, which ones have the highest success rates. Will definitely try capsicium eximum (30 000 SHU), but maybe there are other round-shaped eatable ones if I have no luck with habanero ones. I have eaten once pepper X in my life, but if I can't grow super-hots in my environment I am ok to grow medium hot ones. I will explain exactly what I did to you:
Used:
7 parts soil containing coco coir mixed with universal one (added some peat also)
2 parts crushed keramzite instead of perlite (I have no perlite for now) + hydrogel (spoon)
1 part vermicompost (biohumus)
Sulphur - less than half of spoon, evaporated at 200 celcius
Advantegous microorganims from biohumus (applied after period of sulphur grace period)
Fungicide (1/25 of spoon)
Tytanit (stimulator of growth) - 1/60 of spoon
+ desinfection of my room with dezacid
 
My plant looks good, it maybe grows slightly, but I have my doubts. It twist leaves less on full sun for now. Will try this method along with pure coco noir method (desinfecated and not desinfecated) that you described and control method next year on many seeds. It will of course depends If I have substracts or no, Can I use coco noir from my kitchen?
The things I have:
Vermicompost (universal and complex fertiliser with beneficial microorganisms)
BIohumus (for peppers and universal one)
Fertiliser to green plants and blooming plants (Agricole or sth like that)
Nutrient Cal Mag Pro
Nutrient with algaes (not much of nitrogen)
Nutrient for palms 
Fertiliser Cristallion for green plants
Fungicide Topsin 500 mc - against powdery mildew and grey fungus
Eco spraying containing salts of potassium
Insecticide - acetamiprid
Manure
Some kind of fungicide for pine tree
Keramzite
Bark
Universal Eco Potting Soil
Sand
Mix of peat
Potassium Sulfate
Ammonium Sulfate
Calcium Fertilizer 
Hydrogel
 
Edit:
My observation:
Type of substrate that I created and used at first for my peppers seem to be liked by monstera and other tropical plants. It may be liked also by annual datura. I think hot peppers might like soil containing specific microelements along with potassium and calcium + need specific environment and likely desinfecated greenhouse.
 
What to use against bacterias? I would want probably also obtain dasomet and perlite. Dasomet is too expensive. What do you recommend as alternative in dose less than 5kg? When I need to use cristallion exactly (current plant have 6-7 leaves and 5cm of height). Write me also more about successful peppers and which one to avoid. Wild brasil is good one (simillar to capsicium eximum)? I would prefer not blooming ones, for some reason green plants grow better in my environment.
 
Why are you so obsessed with bacterias and fungus?.
.
I'm just curious to know how many people in this forum that you think spend any amount of time turning their pepper growing space, into a sterile lab environment?   Or how many people treat a nearly pH neutral coco coir based mix, with pH dropping sulfur?  Or add a litany of obscure substances to a seed starter? 
.
Why can't you just mix up a simple mix, put the seeds in it, and focus on keeping the environment stable?  Is there something about the word "simple" that you are averse to?
.
What you just posted sounds like OCD. Until you can learn to do "simple', I think you're going to continue to experience setbacks and failures. 
.
Good luck.
 
Peat was used and advised by a seller.  
solid7 said:
Why are you so obsessed with bacterias and fungus?.
I had a temperate climate pine tree, some blooming cold-liking flower  and many herbs. Literally devoured by fungus and insects like soft scales I think. Fungicide and insecticide, even removing parasites using spiritus didn't work. The peppers that has decayed lately was automatically attacked by fungus and one pepper seemed to like it has been attacked and like it could have symptomps of verticillium wits or anthracnosis. Now I observe weird brown stains on my bromelia and fungicide seems to help but fungus seems to return after some days.  WTH can it be!? I will do anything for my nice plants, maybe it's sth in my tenement house or sth that I have brought from a village. 
I actually use ph reducer from time to time when watering my plant. Its water directly from tap but I have seen that people advise to use still water over a time or mineral water. 
And I first tried grow peppers I tried easily (just a peat and soil -> first post) but it didn't work either.
 
Well, I'm sorry that you are having that difficulty, but here's some sound advice:
.
1) ask nicely around the forum for some new seed stock
2) throw away whatever you are using - don't re-use media
3) make sure you have proper lighting and a fan
4) try posting pics when you start to encounter difficulties.
.
I'm going to say that #4 isn't a bad idea, just in general.  You'll get much better help when you put pictures to your words.  You may be surprised what other see, that isn't obvious to you.
 
->Pepper
50241361096_64abb0a59c.jpg

50241574112_f4b64c795c.jpg

One alive
50241421006_219bf68538_z.jpg

Dead one (overfertilised, probably lack of sun light and led light, not trained with fan, too close to humidifier (only on this photo), ?)
Do you recommend ioniser of air?
I use low energy 48xblue,85xred led lamp, 
During the day or when lack of sun light I use additionall strong 19xwhite led lamp
Green led no used
 
->Other plants (disease may be the same):
50240717628_b2183ea2d2.jpg

Bromelia
 
50241574317_26870684e9.jpg

Monstera (probably needs fertiliser and new pot for now but ikd, generally tall and in quite good condition)
 
Should get cheap microscope....
 
I tend to keep humidity 80% for 2-4 hours per day and 50% at average, I make breaks from time to time. My room dries out when window is opened. I am worried about bacterias in case of bromelia + sth simillar can be seen in that dead plant. Once a month I use sulphur to get rid of pathogens. 
 
80% is too high for pepper plants.  Try to keep the humidity around 40% - 60%.  These plants like stable environments.  Also, when you do make adjustments... ANY adjustments to these plants, they need time to react, and adapt.. we're talking anywhere from one week, up to three.  
 
 
Pepper plants are like cats.. you can't force it to do something.. it'll fight you the whole way.  Let it do what it wants, when it wants.   The plant will tell you what is needed, and when.
 
 
 
Also, what is your watering schedule like?  How often do you water, and how much?
 
Well, recently I have been concentrated on drying out the substrate after applying supply to the ground (biohumus fertiliser, around 1,5 of glass of water) after desinfecating it with sulphur (cuz dasomet is too expensive). What else can I use to  refresh my soil?
Recently I have been watering my plant every 1-2 days, but now I tend to use watering system to pot for 2 hours (quarter of glass in the afternoon) and water my plant additionally when the leafs are dropping during the heat. Now I observe in this simpler formula the plant tend to grow slightly (1 week has passed since transplantation and leaf grow a 1.5cm).
With which peppers have you had success, which ones tends to grow?
 
Every pepper I try grows well.. there are times I get one that acts up but grows out of it.  So far I've grown:  Indian Carbon Ghost, Chocolate Ghost, Red Hab, Chocolate Primo, Black Pearl, Lava Scorpion, Chocolate Bhutlah, and Naglah.  Sometimes, I get bad seeds and they wont start at all.


Plants uptake Sulphur.. so you might be putting the plants into a state of toxicity.. once that happens.. it's hard to get them to bounce back.


Refreshing the soil depends on what style your growing with .. I.E. organic with guanos, worm castings, other forms of scat, and animal / plant parts... Chemical ferts like Miracle gro.. or hydroponic water soluble ferts.  Every style requires a different approach.

When a plant drops it's leaves, it means something. What do the leaves look like when they drop?  Are they still very full, and green? Or are they shriveled, and dry?  Details matter when it comes to what the plant is trying to tell you.  How much N-P-K are you giving it?  Because, that matter as well.

 If you're seeing a 1.5 cm growth in 1 week.. that's not bad... it means it's trying.  I wouldn't do anything different just yet.  Remember, at this point.. not only is it trying to grow leaves, but also roots at the same time.  It has to ration out the energy it accumulated during the day for both.
 
Major Pain said:
Plants uptake Sulphur.. so you might be putting the plants into a state of toxicity.. once that happens.. it's hard to get them to bounce back.
 
How much N-P-K are you giving it?  Because, that matter as well.

 If you're seeing a 1.5 cm growth in 1 week.. that's not bad... it means it's trying.  I wouldn't do anything different just yet.  Remember, at this point.. not only is it trying to grow leaves, but also roots at the same time.  It has to ration out the energy it accumulated during the day for both.
 
Sulfur doesn't contribute to toxicity, as such (in practical terms, it's not a thing).  It drops pH.  Dropping or raising pH interferes with uptake of nutrients.
.
Contrary to popular belief, "safe" levels of NPK don't influence plant growth.  It's only when something is severely out of balance, that it causes antagonistic relationships with other nutrients.  You don't influence plant growth with nutrients, simply by switching the numbers around.  (short of intentionally creating deficiencies, or repairing existing ones)  Plants have x number of ionic receptors for specific macronutrients, and they are either satisfied, or they are not.  That's why it's recommended for beginners to just stick to a balanced fertilizer, and a very basic mix.  It's only when you start understanding how things react with other things, that you need to start getting uber specific on nutrients. 
 
solid7 said:
 
Sulfur doesn't contribute to toxicity, as such (in practical terms, it's not a thing).  It drops pH.  Dropping or raising pH interferes with uptake of nutrients.
.
Contrary to popular belief, "safe" levels of NPK don't influence plant growth.  It's only when something is severely out of balance, that it causes antagonistic relationships with other nutrients.  You don't influence plant growth with nutrients, simply by switching the numbers around.  (short of intentionally creating deficiencies, or repairing existing ones)  Plants have x number of ionic receptors for specific macronutrients, and they are either satisfied, or they are not.  That's why it's recommended for beginners to just stick to a balanced fertilizer, and a very basic mix.  It's only when you start understanding how things react with other things, that you need to start getting uber specific on nutrients. 
 
I stand corrected about the toxicity.
 
 Sorry about the inaccuracies.. New medication, and haven't been thinking / feeling the same quite yet.   I knew something was off when I was typing it all up.. but couldn't quite put my finger on it.  Thanks for clarifying it.  At the time, I asked about the npk because in my mind, I thought it could of been out of balance.  Just going down the list of what could be ailing the plants.
 
Top