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cloning Which branches for rooting cuttings?

MarcV

Extreme Member
It's the second half of september already and temperatures are starting to go down. Since my pepper plants are in pots outside in open air I have to start thinking about taking those that I want to keep inside for the winter. The overwinterers will be turned into a bonchi which means cutting the plant down to the bare minimum.

I want to take some cuttings from the plant I like the most to make some clones, but I never dit this before with a pepper plant. What branches are best suited for this? Should they be woody or not?

I welcome all advise! 🙂
 
I'm curious about this as well. If I'm correct, they're branches that look healthy, not too big, throwing some new growth maybe, a bit green and tender. I just took a few from the top of a jalapeno plant, clipped a lot of the leaves, dipped the ends in honey (not sure if that was actually helpful) then plunked them straight into the water.
 

CaneDog

Extreme Member
I've always heard the new growth (and during the spring growth season) is best, because the hormone profile is most conducive. I suspect doing it soon before they really start slowing down for winter is better. I've also heard taking the cuttings in the morning before the plants getting into the stress of the heat of the day is better.

Then again, my results have been pretty mixed with cuttings. I've definitely see people posting of better success rates than I have. Maybe some of them will chime in about how they select the most promising cuttings.
 
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ahayastani

Extreme Member
It's the second half of september already and temperatures are starting to go down. Since my pepper plants are in pots outside in open air I have to start thinking about taking those that I want to keep inside for the winter. The overwinterers will be turned into a bonchi which means cutting the plant down to the bare minimum.

I want to take some cuttings from the plant I like the most to make some clones, but I never dit this before with a pepper plant. What branches are best suited for this? Should they be woody or not?

I welcome all advise! 🙂

I have tried rooting non-lignified cuttings with succes (I have several examples in my previous GLOG, such as this one). It works, but it's not faster than starting from seeds.
 
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I would definitely go for green new branches! There are two different approaches that I use for clones. One is to take a lot of clones and just put in a cup of water. Usually a few will make roots. (Im guessing 1/4 or something, but there are probably lots of factors)
The other approach is to put a few in rockwool, and put them inside a mini greenhouse/propagator. There you should be close to 100% success rate.
 

MarcV

Extreme Member
I have tried rooting non-lignified cuttings with succes (I have several examples in my previous GLOG, such as this one). It works, but it's not faster than starting from seeds.
"Faster" is not what I'm looking for. I just want to have a couple of plants that grow identical fruits to the original. I will start from seed again also. But even if the variety is the same, individual plants might still be a bit different...
 

ahayastani

Extreme Member
"Faster" is not what I'm looking for. I just want to have a couple of plants that grow identical fruits to the original. I will start from seed again also. But even if the variety is the same, individual plants might still be a bit different...

It will work. I've done it a few times and ended up with producing plants. Although it takes some time to get the plant going, so to speak. Root formation takes about a month, and then another month for your cutting to grow into a plantlet.
 
This is what I've set up to clone a jalapeno with a flavor/heat I've been happy with. I can follow up in a month or two to let you know how it's worked.

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