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disease Worrying signs on leaves

Just found some of my seedlings looking like this. Could someone please tell me what this is to save me having to search, as I have to prepare for my daughter's birthday party and am a bit short on time? Thanks.
 

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Well that's a beginner's mistake I won't make again. I had noticed quite a few fungus gnats flying around, and assumed they were to blame for the slow growth of some of my plants. To prevent them getting into the soil, I mulched most of the seedlings with quartz sand. A couple of days later, I saw that some of the leaves were still covered in sand, and just assumed they must have been wet when I sprinkled it on. I guess that must have been the start of the aphid invasion, because I have just finished removing what I would guesstimate to be thousands of the little buggers. There's no way I will have gotten all of them, but at least it gives the seedlings a chance to hopefully recover in the meantime, and I'll just have to check and remove daily until they grow big enough to resort to other measures.
 
Aphids are a real pain when they appear indoor... good luck for the upcoming battle!
 
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Sorry to hear that. Aphids indoors are a big pain, especially with sprouts. If you have your sprouts each in its own small container you can take them to the sink and carefully rinse them off while supporting the small plant and letting the water pool in your free hand while you jostle and rub the leaves. I hold them sideways and rotate them so I don't get water into the soil or soil into the sink. It's a pain, but it's much more effective than manual removal and it cleans the aphids out of the very center of the growth tips, which is where they do the most and quickest damage to the sprout.
 
Sorry to hear that. Aphids indoors are a big pain, especially with sprouts. If you have your sprouts each in its own small container you can take them to the sink and carefully rinse them off while supporting the small plant and letting the water pool in your free hand while you jostle and rub the leaves. I hold them sideways and rotate them so I don't get water into the soil or soil into the sink. It's a pain, but it's much more effective than manual removal and it cleans the aphids out of the very center of the growth tips, which is where they do the most and quickest damage to the sprout.
Thanks for the suggestion, CD. I'll try that with the few which are alone in their containers, but they are still mainly either in twos or threes, or in a tray with multiple pods in it. Here's a video I followed to get rid of most of them in the meantime. I'll maybe try twisting the tape into a point to see if I can get right into the centre though.

 
I am not going to say anyone else's methods are not effective, but...

I had an really bad aphid infection on my new (indoor) plants several years ago. I tried spraying with water, insecticidal soap, neem, even vacuuming the little beasts off my plants, nothing worked.

Until, I bought 100 live ladybugs on Amazon. I released about 25 onto my plants, and within a week or so, all the aphids were gone.

Afterwards, I did find a couple ladybugs flying around the house, and a few dead ones some weeks later, but they are harmless to people and pets, so I wasn't worried. The rest of them I kept in the container they arrived in in the refrigerator for next couple weeks (they naturally sort of 'hibernate' when the temperature drops) and released them outside once the weather warmed up.
 
I am not going to say anyone else's methods are not effective, but...

I had an really bad aphid infection on my new (indoor) plants several years ago. I tried spraying with water, insecticidal soap, neem, even vacuuming the little beasts off my plants, nothing worked.

Until, I bought 100 live ladybugs on Amazon. I released about 25 onto my plants, and within a week or so, all the aphids were gone.

Afterwards, I did find a couple ladybugs flying around the house, and a few dead ones some weeks later, but they are harmless to people and pets, so I wasn't worried. The rest of them I kept in the container they arrived in in the refrigerator for next couple weeks (they naturally sort of 'hibernate' when the temperature drops) and released them outside once the weather warmed up.
I had thought about ladybirds, but wasn't sure whether the seedlings could handle being swarmed yet. How old were your plants when you did this?
 
I had thought about ladybirds, but wasn't sure whether the seedlings could handle being swarmed yet. How old were your plants when you did this?
They were about 8 weeks.

If you decide to use the ladybugs, make sure you get the right species.

Some good reading:

 
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Afterwards, I did find a couple ladybugs flying around the house, and a few dead ones some weeks later, but they are harmless to people and pets, so I wasn't worried

Unless those ladybugs are from Australia, in that case just start to sprint away from the house.

Cheers!
 
Asked my wife if there were any plans before I go in to late shift today. Her reply? "I should imagine you'll be busy killing triffids!
Kind of puts a new angle on how serious the problem COULD have been in a parallel universe :seeya::D.
 
Afterwards, I did find a couple ladybugs flying around the house, and a few dead ones some weeks later, but they are harmless to people and pets, so I wasn't worried

Unless those ladybugs are from Australia, in that case just start to sprint away from the house.

Cheers!
Well, everything from Australia will kill you, so...
 
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