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seeds A few semi-noob seed questions

I've been actively gardening fairly large plots (8th acre and up) for well over 10 ten years, and am pretty darn good at getting an enviable crop of some damm tasty vegies. One thing I have never done but would like to start next season is planting with seed from this years harvest. I'm going to bring in a healthy crop of anaheims, one of my best ever, and would like to repeat next season with this crops seed.
 
A few questions out of sheer ignernce and lack of good response to goo-gle searches (maybe I don't ask the right questions or ask the questions right, I dunno)...
 
Is there an environmental advantage to replanting with seed from the same dirt/climate/seasonal characteristics?
 
I planted three different varieties of Anaheim in the same row (one a hybrid), will this pose problems?
 
Do the chiles need to be ripe to cull viable seed? Zone 3 can be a dangerous place to leave vegetable out to fully ripen in September.
 
Is there any difference in germination rate from purchased seed? I only assume that if there were, it's because my seeds may be "fresher".
 
Will the seed be unuseable if pulled from a roasted pod?
 
I'm only doing this with my anaheims and my Christmas lima beans because of the great result I'm getting from this years crop. My bells did squat, and I have yet to develop a hot chile breed, at least consistently. Out of 30+ plants I've found a total of 2 (two) red ripe anaheims, both from the same plant, which was, coincidentally, the most productive in the rows.
 
I plan to pick up some seed from you guys on hotter varieties, can't wait to see what this western Minnesnowta muck will do with them!!
 
Thanks for any input.... :pray:
 
Is there an environmental advantage to replanting with seed from the same dirt/climate/seasonal characteristics?   Yes, but this takes many "seasons".   A natural evolution so to speak.
 
I planted three different varieties of Anaheim in the same row (one a hybrid), will this pose problems?  No, but it can possibly affect the seeds they produce for your next planting.  That's called cross-pollination
 
Do the chiles need to be ripe to cull viable seed? Zone 3 can be a dangerous place to leave vegetable out to fully ripen in September.        Yes, they need to at least be turning to the ripened stage before seed harvest.
 
Is there any difference in germination rate from purchased seed? I only assume that if there were, it's because my seeds may be "fresher".   Purchased seed have varying germination rates.  It depends on how seeds were handled,grown, etc.   Your own seed will always be more "fresh" and "viable"  IF you process them correctly.
 
Will the seed be unuseable if pulled from a roasted pod?  Most likely.  Over 100 degrees is detrimental to seed viability.
 
All answers are to best of my knowledge thus far.
 
These are rare in my back 40....
 
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The three varieties of pepper I "mixed" up in the garden were all store-bought Ferry-Morse Anaheim, one being sold as "organic" Joe Parker, and a Jung Seed hybrid called "Biggie Chile". Although all labeled medium hot, they are very mild chiles, I wouldn't mind finding the hotter variety of Anaheim-type, if it exists.
 
Thanks for the info, Streamer!
 
All of the Anaheim types I have ever grown have been medium/low heat peppers also.   If there is a HOT type of Anaheim, I don't know about it off hand..
Actually, I grew the Anaheim types for their pleasant and manageable "kiss" of heat.  It's not every day
that I crave  >> :mouthonfire:
 
Streamer said:
All of the Anaheim types I have ever grown have been medium/low heat peppers also.   If there is a HOT type of Anaheim, I don't know about it off hand..
Actually, I grew the Anaheim types for their pleasant and manageable "kiss" of heat.  It's not every day
that I crave  >> :mouthonfire:
Interesting, I hear of "hot" anaheims a lot. The Scoville spread is reputedly 500 to 2000, I've never tried the warmer ones that I know of, if they do exist. My chiles rellenos use chorizo for heat, but still...
 
Them dudes that live down there near Hatch tell me there are Anaheim's as hot/hotter that n Peños.
 
If I was a grower, that would be my go to. At least in my top 3.

The name "Hatch" can only be used for chiles grown in that region. Like "Kobe Beef" or "Champagne".
 
Scoville DeVille said:
Them dudes that live down there near Hatch tell me there are Anaheim's as hot/hotter that n Peños.
 
If I was a grower, that would be my go to. At least in my top 3.

The name "Hatch" can only be used for chiles grown in that region. Like "Kobe Beef" or "Champagne".
I've heard that as well, but my authoritive source tells me that Hatch type chiles are grown in a huge valley that goes as far as Pueblo CO. I've also heard of the "hotternell" variety from the same source, but she hasn't offered up seed. THAT'S what I'm waiting for...
 
stettoman said:
Interesting, I hear of "hot" anaheims a lot. The Scoville spread is reputedly 500 to 2000, 
 
 
500-2000?   Hot Tamales brand Candy is hotter than that.:))   I'm sure Hotter Anaheims exist just never searched em out.  Again, the milder Anaheims make some very delicious sauces.   And for that purpose, I wouldn't adulterate them with a HOT as HELL variety of Anaheim even if I had the chance.   Now if Anaheim is your favorite type of pepper, you want hotter,and it grows extremely well in your garden's locale, then I completely understand your quest for a high heat variety Anaheim.
 
Please post here what you find available.  Sounds interesting.
 
Our local Market here in South Texas have the HATCH chillis every year in Aug-Sept.   Every HATCH product/ condiment is also on the shelves   I've tried the Fresh Hatch Peppers and they are FANTASTIC.    Not HOT.  JUst mild.  But, Wonderful Flavor
 
Streamer, we don't have that honor up here, our Hatch chiles are shipped frozen in 5 pound chubs, and @ $60/5lbs, they ARE gold. Also why I grow my own. I make a lot of chile-based dishes, and yes, I can add all manner of hot, but it would be nice to have a chile with a bite of it's own, especially when doing a bulk recipe like salsa.

My garden is going to host a whole new world of peppers next season, and I'm beginning with an aji amarillo inside project over winter, and for our "bland white sauce" Minnesota family who spent 12 years in AZ learning the magic of heat, I'd like my anaheims to step up as well.....
 
Ok, found the heat in the anaheims. Deseeded the ripe ones this morning.

Just got done rinsing my left eye.

I'm glad anaheim was all I deseeded. And me with a box of surgical gloves in the cupboard......
 
Ok, I have a handful of very large pods at various degrees of ripening, some are in the brownish stage, some have a red tip, some in between...Are these good for culling seed? Before I roast them, that is.....
 
stettoman said:
Ok, I have a handful of very large pods at various degrees of ripening, some are in the brownish stage, some have a red tip, some in between...Are these good for culling seed? Before I roast them, that is.....
 
Nevermind, I saved the seed anyway. Kept them separate from the seeds out of ripe peppers. Will find out if they're any good when I stick 'em in a Solo...
 
Is there an environmental advantage to replanting with seed from the same dirt/climate/seasonal characteristics?
 
No. 
 
Yup, I understand the nomenclature issue, been at the big green chile trough for muchos anos. But with the constant diddling of genetics comes diddling with the nomenclature. I love the BIG green chiles, just looking for a hot version....
 
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