Any 'cold' peppers?

Thanks for the suggestions guys, I'll check them out when I've got some time and give them consideration for next year's growing season.


Sure, it's warm, but I bet you were stung by at least 13 venomous insects while typing that post. And 3 mammals.

Speaking of cold, is it the actual ice formation that kills the plants, or can they die slightly above freezing as well? This week's forecast calls for lows around 5 degrees C, which works out to mid-40s for you Fahreignors. Should I just curse Odin and get the plants inside for the winter or are they gonna be fine a while longer yet?
Mate once you get used to the creepy crawleys , they dont bother you , its mainly only a problem when your trying to sleep and they crawl under ya sheets, in OZ we let the creepy crawleys sleep at the end of ya bed like others do with there pets , lol .
Its quite funny what others think australias like , a pommy mate of mine when he migrated to australia as a kid was to scared to get of the plane as he was scared of spiders .
 
Are you hoping to overwinter them? If so, bring them in any time there's a chance of frost.
It's in the plan, but I really haven't prepared an indoor area for them yet. I've got about 14 plants in pots, and another 6 in the ground. I'm considering digging up the 6 in the ground just because I have an irrational attachment to all these poor bastards that survived the trauma of being my first grows. Also, I've got an entire winter's worth of accidental plant-killing to get through, so more fodder for my unintentional bloodlust will help me actually have something survive to next spring.

Once I do bring them in, will the peppers/flowers be the first things to drop in the reduced light? Or will they finish what they've started and just stop producing more? I guess I'll give the overwintering thread another skim, as it probably answers this there....

Mate once you get used to the creepy crawleys , they dont bother you , its mainly only a problem when your trying to sleep and they crawl under ya sheets, in OZ we let the creepy crawleys sleep at the end of ya bed like others do with there pets , lol .
Its quite funny what others think australias like , a pommy mate of mine when he migrated to australia as a kid was to scared to get of the plane as he was scared of spiders .
Ah, bugs don't bug me, but I'm never one to let a good stereotype go to waste ;)

There's definitely something to be said about Canada though, nothing here is gonna kill you unless it's in a manly fight to the finish, and not just "Whoops, forgot to turn the condom inside out to check for scorpions first".

Edit: After further research, it turns out that Australian scorpions are one of the few creatures that probably won't kill you with venom. Thanks internet!
 
While pubescens do tolerate "colder" weather, like Mark said, even they die off once the temps get too low. We also had a mild winter this past one, but I brought 10 of 48 plants into the house and left 38 out in the detached garage in their pots. All 38 in the garage died once it got too cold, including the pubescens.

You mentioned temps getting down to about 40F in your area. As long as that's not sustained temps, your plants are likely to do ok, assuming you protect from frost. The general guideline is to start protecting at 50F, and that's the roots, not above-soil. Since the roots are in soil, that will protect them if the ambient temps get somewhat below 50F (again, depending upon variety.) But yes, it's a good idea to start preparing a place for them inside.
 
It's in the plan, but I really haven't prepared an indoor area for them yet. I've got about 14 plants in pots, and another 6 in the ground. I'm considering digging up the 6 in the ground just because I have an irrational attachment to all these poor bastards that survived the trauma of being my first grows. Also, I've got an entire winter's worth of accidental plant-killing to get through, so more fodder for my unintentional bloodlust will help me actually have something survive to next spring.

Once I do bring them in, will the peppers/flowers be the first things to drop in the reduced light? Or will they finish what they've started and just stop producing more? I guess I'll give the overwintering thread another skim, as it probably answers this there....


Ah, bugs don't bug me, but I'm never one to let a good stereotype go to waste ;)

There's definitely something to be said about Canada though, nothing here is gonna kill you unless it's in a manly fight to the finish, and not just "Whoops, forgot to turn the condom inside out to check for scorpions first".

Edit: After further research, it turns out that Australian scorpions are one of the few creatures that probably won't kill you with venom. Thanks internet!
last grayfish season i was out in my boat with my son , 4 mile out pulling pots, after pulling one of the pots and lifting it into the back of the boat i was cleaning out the seaweed when i felt something on my foot , when i looked
down i was a blue ringed octopus on my foot , after passing a few bricks (POOPING myself) i flicked my foot and it flew to the back of the boat , i knew that normlly you dont feel them bite and that i had about 3 min before respiratory failure, i went flat out back to the marina , , after about 3 min when i knew i could still breath i knew i was safe, its funny , snakes and spiders dont scare me but those little golfball sized occys scare the hell out of me.
 
Look for wild chili tepins from desert areas with cold(ish) winters. I have seen tepins several years old growing in the ground in Tucson, AZ where the average low gets down to about 40 in late December and there are usually several days each year below freezing.
 
Serranos do very well in colder weather compared to most varieties, they originated in the mountains in Puebla and Hidalgo, Mexico, where I'm sure it gets colder than the lower altitude regions. Serranos and pubescens are always the last ones standing for me, and they continue to set pods in colder fall temperatures several weeks after other varieties stop.
 
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