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seeds First from-the-seed year - some questions

Bou

Extreme Member
DontPanic said:
 
Did you use straight 3% Hydrogen Peroxide Solution?
 
That might be too strong.  Usually I put about a tablespoon of 3% HOOH in a cup or so of water for my soak.
 
For what it's wort, I always soak them in 3% H2O2 for 2-3 hours, then rinse and soak in tap water for another 24h or so. I usually have really good germination rate without any fungus related issues!
 
Thanks for all the advice!
 
I didn't end up getting a heater, but a friend gave me some planting cells and nice Amish dirt he likes, so I'm at it again with some old seeds and some new seeds.
 
In answer to some of the questions, almost all of the seeds are from White Hot Peppers. I put all of the seeds I may have toasted in the last attempt in this dirt, along with some new seeds, which I didn't treat with H2O2. If this setup (described below) doesn't work, I'll break down and get a real germinating setup, or just buy plants when its that time of year...
 
I took a coffee tin and supported a 6-cell planter on its rim, filled with some good, loose starting mix, and placed the seeds on top. I put a little water in the bottom of the can, to keep the air humid, and moistened the soil with mists of water. I then made copper wire hoops and covered the thing with plastic wrap, then placed it under a lamp. Below is an ok picture of the contraption. Any suggestions? Should this work?
 
NJ
 

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Pimental said:
I took a coffee tin and supported a 6-cell planter on its rim, filled with some good, loose starting mix, and placed the seeds on top.
 
Perhaps this was omitted from your description, but scattering the seeds on the surface of the potting soil will work poorly.
 
The seeds need to be about one-half to an inch deep.  The seeds need to be below the surface to use the soil to remove the seed husk as they germinate.  If they're just sitting on the surface, many of them will end up trapped in the seed husk.  This is often referred to as "Helmet Head".
 
If I misunderstood, Great!  Otherwise you should still have time to mix these into the soil if you just did this today.
 
DontPanic said:
 
Perhaps this was omitted from your description, but scattering the seeds on the surface of the potting soil will work poorly.
 
The seeds need to be about one-half to an inch deep.  The seeds need to be below the surface to use the soil to remove the seed husk as they germinate.  If they're just sitting on the surface, many of them will end up trapped in the seed husk.  This is often referred to as "Helmet Head".
 
If I misunderstood, Great!  Otherwise you should still have time to mix these into the soil if you just did this today.
No, thank you, I did forget that. I thought I'd heard something about it; should have looked it up. So - thanks. I had just set this up tonight, They are now a little "down under".
 
I think soaking the seeds helps and probably speeds things up some, but not totally necessary. I use seed starting trays similar to what's posted above sitting on top of a heat mat. and just bury the seeds a little bit. I get surprisingly high germ rates and it's easy.

Keep them moist and warm. I think you probably had them too warm earlier if the paper towel was burning.
 
Everyone has their own way of doing things but I don't seem to get good germination from planting the seeds straight into seed compost (or "dirt" as you people over the pond probably call it.)
 
My method:
Soak the seeds in warm water (sometimes I use weak tea or chamomile tea.  I haven't tried peroxide yet.)
In my experience, any seeds which are still floating after 24 hours won't germinate.  Only the ones that sink to the bottom are viable.  (I stir them round a few times during the soaking to make sure surface tension of the water isn't an issue.)
Transfer the seeds onto moist tissue in a sealed plastic box.  Keep in a warm place (I use my airing cupboard.)
When they "pop" i.e. the root starts growing, transfer them to growing medium - I use Jiffy 7s.
When the roots grow through the Jiffy 7s (usually at about 2 pairs of true leaves) then plant up in a larger container (I use pop bottles or porridge pots which are like large cups.  I like to re-use as many single-use plastics as possible.)
When the weather is warm enough to put them outside, plant up into large pots.
 
Remember, the seeds don't need light to germinate, only warmth.  If you have a warm, dark place, they will be happy there.  You only need to give them light once they have germinated.
 
Mitzi said:
In my experience, any seeds which are still floating after 24 hours won't germinate.  Only the ones that sink to the bottom are viable.
 
You may have more false positives applying this screening technique when you use peroxide.  You get many more floaters from bubbles forming on the seed casing.
 
As the peroxide goes to work, it turns into tiny air bubbles.  Sometimes, it's just the peroxide air bubbles that are causing the seed to float.
 
DontPanic said:
 
You may have more false positives applying this screening technique when you use peroxide.  You get many more floaters from bubbles forming on the seed casing.
 
As the peroxide goes to work, it turns into tiny air bubbles.  Sometimes, it's just the peroxide air bubbles that are causing the seed to float.
 
That's useful to know.
 
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