health Habaneros Getting Soft

Good morning-
I hope that it not poor etiquette to ask a question soon after joining? This is my first year growing habaneros and did quite well I believe as two plants provided well over 100 peppers. There were so many still green and I wanted to try and save the plants so I transplanted them into pots and brought them inside. Many of the peppers have ripened; however, they’re soft and I’ve lack the really firm exterior of their fellow peppers harvested earlier. They’re not mushy and the flavor seems fine but I’m just curious what may be causing this? My uneducated guesses would be that they’ve been on the vine too long or the move shocked them(?). They’re a Bonnie brand from one of the box stores, planted outside in early May, and transplanted last week before the first frost in South Central PA.

Sorry if this has been discussed or I didn’t provide enough information.

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 
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Yep. It's a common response if you dig them out of the ground and move them to pots at that stage, even if you take a good sized root ball. I'm experiencing that currently with a variegated jalapeno I decided to save from a raised bed before it got too far gone with the weather.

AS FYI - After harvesting some pods for seeds if needed, I'll prune the plant back both roots and foliage and get proper potting mix around the reduced root ball and let the plant settle in and start growing back again adjusted to its new conditions. The soil around the root ball from the garden typically also doesn't have the right composition for the plant to thrive, so I replace as much as possible and improved the drainage.

Also, pruning the foliage...
Good morning-
I hope that it not poor etiquette to ask a question soon after joining? This is my first year growing habaneros and did quite well I believe as two plants provided well over 100 peppers. There were so many still green and I wanted to try and save the plants so I transplanted them into pots and brought them inside. Many of the peppers have ripened; however, they’re soft and I’ve lack the really firm exterior of their fellow peppers harvested earlier. They’re not mushy and the flavor seems fine but I’m just curious what may be causing this? My uneducated guesses would be that they’ve been on the vine too long or the move shocked them(?). They’re a Bonnie brand from one of the box stores, planted outside in early May, and transplanted last week before the first frost in South Central PA.

Sorry if this has been discussed or I didn’t provide enough information.

Thanks in advance for any advice!
Just a thought, it may not be a good time to transplant when the plant has fruit. Sounds like dehydration.
 

CaneDog

Extreme Member
Yep. It's a common response if you dig them out of the ground and move them to pots at that stage, even if you take a good sized root ball. I'm experiencing that currently with a variegated jalapeno I decided to save from a raised bed before it got too far gone with the weather.

AS FYI - After harvesting some pods for seeds if needed, I'll prune the plant back both roots and foliage and get proper potting mix around the reduced root ball and let the plant settle in and start growing back again adjusted to its new conditions. The soil around the root ball from the garden typically also doesn't have the right composition for the plant to thrive, so I replace as much as possible and improved the drainage.

Also, pruning the foliage back will make it easier to deal with the aphids that often appear once the plant starts to warm up indoors, especially under lights. It would be a rare situation that I'd try to get a plant to produce indoors over winter after being an outdoor plant because there's so much change for aphid invasion. Instead, I just keep them cool enough that the aphids can't really get going and wait until spring to put them outside again. Then again, with just a few plants it could be manageable.
 
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