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How do I manage a schedule with 341 hours of shows over 2 months?

This upcoming fair season, I was able to book myself into some of the biggest state fairs we have in CT.  Now that the contracts are in place, deposits are paid and the venue booked, I need to start looking at staffing.  341.5 total fair hours of billable time if an employee were to help.  I'll be there earlier than the times posted each day on setup day and later for breakdown day.  The booth stays up during the duration so each night I can simply remove the cash box, lock the tent down and let the police patrol the venue.
 
One question I have is: What's the best place to find employees to work for cash, all or partial hours?  I have a few people I know, but doubtful anyone wants to slug out a 46 hour work week at the Durham fair, even if it's the largest in the state.
 
Another question is, how do I take care of myself during this time?  Some of those events are damn near 15 hour days.  I can't leave my booth, per show rules, the booth must be staffed at all times.  Should I be taking chronic breaks from the booth?  Maybe 30 minutes per 4 hours?  How do I stay sane, not get exhausted and not loose to much money?
 
I am fully prepared to run the booth myself, but sales will suffer because people get impatient.  Any show I've done by myself, I've noticed if too many people queue up, the ones in back take off after a little while.  I will try to engage everyone and say hello, etc.  But even if I'm handing out samples, if someone ponies up with a credit card, I'm stuck there for 1-2 minutes doing the credit card swipe, and apologizing to people that it's taking so long, etc.  I keep the cash behind me in a cash box, so if someone pays with a $100 bill (don't you love that?) I have to go get change.  That puts me in a position to turn my back to the customer and while I'm not worried about someone stealing a bottle of sauce as much as people walking that could be buying... it also seems rude.
 
Having a 2nd person there seems to put all that at ease.  I work with a guy who's daughter has helped me out and I've given her $10 per hour to assist, which she thinks is fair.  I've never had employees before.
 
Please pardon my third question but where do I find girls to staff the booth with me for $10 per hour?  I say girls because when I have another guy help me, we don't do nearly as much sales as when I have even a quiet girl standing there.
 
Is there a source I can contact for staffing at shows?
 
Here's the schedule I'm looking at.
 
schedule.PNG
 
Sam & Oliver said:
Hey if you guys ever get out my way, let me know... first 3 rounds are on me.
 
I've found most of my help, oddly enough, the people who I recruited for the show asked me if they could do the entire event, open to close and not have to split shifts.  I'm going to hire a friend's high school kid on day 1 and the last day of each show for a few hours for the muscle.  Not because I need a massage, but for lugging equipment around.  hopefully I won't have much product on the last day!
 
I've got alternatives as well for each show I told I would let know ASAP if the other cancels.
 
My going rate was $15/hr weekdays, $20/hr weekends.
 
The state fairs: Durham, Woodstock, etc (from my schedule) are state agricultural fairs.  Quite literally, you could play the Benny Hill song from the time the gates open until they turn off the lights.  Nearly shoulder-to-shoulder foot traffic.
 
My last expo I did with help back in May.  After COG I was making just over $100/hr with heavy foot traffic in an outdoor vending setup, back in may with a crappy advertised expo on a rented fairgrounds.  These state fairs attract people from up to 100 miles away who drive in for the entire day.
 
Durham Fair, on a saturday night, just a single section of the main concourse.  The fair is about 30x of what you see here:
8037697581_1e3a2c0a1a_b.jpg
Hope to get to see you this weekend in Durham. Where are you going to be? 
 
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