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chinense I'm confused about the Datil pepper

Been to the island of Minorca twice and there are no datil peppers to be found on that island. Except for some geeky peppergrowers (like me) maybe that ordered them from overseas. I have this one high on my future growlist, but definitely want them to be as close to the original as possible. Will be following this thread closely!
 

The Hot Pepper

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Datil seeds from Pure Florida arrived quicker than expected! I ordered more from an Ebay seller as plan B but I have high hopes for these.
Will Ferrell Reaction GIF
 

The Hot Pepper

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Admin
Been to the island of Minorca twice and there are no datil peppers to be found on that island. Except for some geeky peppergrowers (like me) maybe that ordered them from overseas. I have this one high on my future growlist, but definitely want them to be as close to the original as possible. Will be following this thread closely!
The more credible story is how they came from Cuba but were used by the Minorcan community.
 
Yup, coming from the carribean is way more plausible! Minorcans trying to incorporate some heritage that isn't theirs. They should have sticked to their real heritage... stone slinging and building endless stone walls in the landscape 😁
They do deserve credit for picking up on growing and cultivating them though!
 

The Hot Pepper

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I've also read that the jelly maker in question, S.B. Valls, came from Chile not Cuba. It's even on the Visit St. Augustine website and in the St. Augustine Record as Chile. lol. Who knows?
 

The Hot Pepper

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Since the pepper's history is folklore, I don't think it matters anyway. It's like trying to find out who made the first hamburger, and you know, there are multiple stories and those related to one of the stories will claim it as the real truth, just like this.
 
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Grass Snake

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Since the pepper's history is folklore, I don't think it matters anyway. It's like trying to find out who made the first hamburger, and you know, there are multiple stories and those related to one of the stories will claim it as the real truth, just like this.
I'm sure everyone agrees the Datil has strong roots in St. Augustine FL. The Datil might have looked quite different when introduced to Florida. I like to think the Datil is the result of work done by Floridians. That's why I'm not too concerned about where and who brought it to Florida. Christopher Columbus could have brought it but it wouldn't change how I feel about the pepper.
 

The Hot Pepper

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I do believe it was stabilized in Florida because you can't find it where they say it's from. So prob looked different. Hell, it could have grow wild in FL and that's where it is from lol!
 
I am growing Datil from Refining Fire Chiles seeds this year.

The Datil pepper is often described as “frutier than a habanero”, which seems to be the description of almost every chinense pepper other than orange habanero - so that seems almost meaningless.

I like growing peppers with an established history and tradition. I’m hoping for a nice unique flavor.
 
I'm late to this party, but I'll put my two cents worth in. Last year I grew the Baker Creek version:

BC_Datil.jpg


That's it on the far right. It was about the size of a small jalapeno, most of them with blunt tips instead of pointed tips. It was just a tiny smidgeon less hot than the SB I grew (at the bottom) with a taste leaning a tad more toward habanero than SB. It was a really good pepper, though, and very productive. Last summer, I kinda had to abandon things due to a family death, but I bet I would have harvested over a hundred pods off of it. I will definitely grow it again.
 

Grass Snake

Extreme Member
I am growing Datil from Refining Fire Chiles seeds this year.

The Datil pepper is often described as “frutier than a habanero”, which seems to be the description of almost every chinense pepper other than orange habanero - so that seems almost meaningless.

I like growing peppers with an established history and tradition. I’m hoping for a nice unique flavor.
a regular habanero is more on the floral side so “fruity” is used to let you know this Chinense isn’t as floral.
 

Grass Snake

Extreme Member
Th
I'm late to this party, but I'll put my two cents worth in. Last year I grew the Baker Creek version:

BC_Datil.jpg


That's it on the far right. It was about the size of a small jalapeno, most of them with blunt tips instead of pointed tips. It was just a tiny smidgeon less hot than the SB I grew (at the bottom) with a taste leaning a tad more toward habanero than SB. It was a really good pepper, though, and very productive. Last summer, I kinda had to abandon things due to a family death, but I bet I would have harvested over a hundred pods off of it. I will definitely grow it again.
The more I hear about the Baker Creek Datil the more interesting it becomes. It’s currently in my shopping cart haha.
 
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