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My first supper hots, how best to enjoy them.

This year I am growing my first of what I understand to be in the super hot categrory. :) While my trinidad scorpions turned out to be a scam, and merely some generic chili peppers... the ghosts look more legit. :)

So now I'm contemplating, how best to enjoy the first fruit of this plant. Straight and uncut, or in a chili? Any suggestions?

I've had some habeneros inthe past that had enough kick that I have to admit that anything hotter scares me a bit. But it's a good kind of scared.

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Try drying and powdering them or make a sauce. They are too hot for general fresh consumption although I would recommend trying a piece fresh
 
My first scotch bonnet I just poppe din my mouth while driving hoem form the produce store. That was a mistake. Since I grew these myself I won't be in a car, but I don't want to do something similary foolish. :)
 
IMO, you should always taste at least a little bit of what you grow. How else will you know what to pair it with in cooking and such? And of course, if you are wanting to increase your heat tolerance, just pop a whole one in your mouth. It will hurt like an effer, but you'll be surprised just how much your tolerance will increase from that one pepper alone.
 
I definitely recommend eating one fresh just so you can say you have done it. I cut them up and put them on everything fresh. They are especially good in eggs.
 
yemtol, I'm not sure if your video makes me more or less excited for these things. hehe.

From your intro I'd say I'm in close to the same league of pepper tolerance as you. most of the spicy selection at restaurants just isn't any more. But I still don't gargle with the super hottest of hot sauces.

I have a close friend who also love hot food, i think we'll both eat one and the rest (I have about a dozen still ripening on the plant) will go into a salsa or powder.
 
A little follow up.

A few friends and I gathered to celebrate the 'rippening'.

At first we cut one up into small pieces and then each took pieces to eat. It was hot, probably slightly hotter than any other pepper I had eaten. But fell short of the legendary heat of the super hots.

Fearing we had made a mistake in how we ate it, and emboldened by surviving a brush with a ghost we got cocky. The two of us most enthusiastic about peppers decided little pieces were for babies and we wanted to prove we were men.

We picked the most gnarled, meanest looking pepper from the plant and cut it in half then each popped half in our mouths.

I'm sure you're all aware enough of how these things work to expect this, but there was a significantly different experience. The size of the half pepper necessitated a lot more chewing. And that in turn lead to a lot more oil and pieces spreading to places they didn't get with the tiny pieces. Such as underneath the tongue.

And then we realized we were dumb. The ghost when eaten in such a fashion was closer akin to physical pain than any pepper I've ever eaten.
I don't think I'll ever eat another one straight. From now on, sauces and blends. :)
 
Slice real thin and try on a bologna sandwich with mayonaise. You've got to try them to taste them. Then, ferment the rest into a sauce.
 
A little follow up.

A few friends and I gathered to celebrate the 'rippening'.

At first we cut one up into small pieces and then each took pieces to eat. It was hot, probably slightly hotter than any other pepper I had eaten. But fell short of the legendary heat of the super hots.

Fearing we had made a mistake in how we ate it, and emboldened by surviving a brush with a ghost we got cocky. The two of us most enthusiastic about peppers decided little pieces were for babies and we wanted to prove we were men.

We picked the most gnarled, meanest looking pepper from the plant and cut it in half then each popped half in our mouths.

I'm sure you're all aware enough of how these things work to expect this, but there was a significantly different experience. The size of the half pepper necessitated a lot more chewing. And that in turn lead to a lot more oil and pieces spreading to places they didn't get with the tiny pieces. Such as underneath the tongue.

And then we realized we were dumb. The ghost when eaten in such a fashion was closer akin to physical pain than any pepper I've ever eaten.
I don't think I'll ever eat another one straight. From now on, sauces and blends. :)



Ya they are wicked hot its insane!!!! bhuts are sickkkk.. I just had one today again and a dorset naga and they both have that searing tongue feeling and under the tongue as well.. And also, being that the heat is mostly in the placenta, if you trie the tip first you prob didnt get much at all of the actual heat of the pepper.. Big mistake to bite the tip, say, oh this isnt too bad, and then crunch on te wholle thing rofl
 
Try to find a dehydrator and a spice/coffee grinder at yard sales. Powders are great. Just be careful not to mace yourself or others. Got mine for a total of less than eight bucks.
 
On each plant, I try about a 1/2" piece at the tip first... Usually not as hot. This is my first year adding Superhots to my pepper garden and so far that has worked for me. I get to try the actual flavor a little before the burn gets all consuming.. haha.. Then I eat the rest and get lit! lol
 
My first scotch bonnet I just poppe din my mouth while driving hoem form the produce store. That was a mistake. Since I grew these myself I won't be in a car, but I don't want to do something similary foolish. :)
hot damn i would have paid to be driving next to you when you did that!
 
I don't think I'll ever eat another one straight. From now on, sauces and blends. :)
Slice them in half from the end upwards, enough to open them up (keep them attached at the stem end), pull out the seeds with tweezers to save from the best ones. And put them in the freezer.
The freezing (and splitting them in half like that) helps speed up drying. So a week or more in the freezer you can either pull them out use them in sauces or cooking; or take them out and dry them in a oven set to 110F and turn into powder.
I like bhuts in sauces and powders so that's what I do with them. I do like their flavour.
I just use habs, annuums and baccatums fresh.

One exception: I only have 7 pot red or 'trinidad' chillies (like TS etc) with that flavour profile in cooked sauces (not home made chilli sauces, but any meals I simmer a sauce for - not a fan of their flavour fresh, too strong may as well have 7 pot served on cardboard as it would taste the same .
But I love the yellow 7 fresh though in a sandwich. Not as hot but that's not the reason why, it's got a nice mellow flavour that goes well in a sandwich and not over powering so that's the hottest chinense that's the exception and I have fresh.
 
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