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Pepper help

Hi, I hope someone can help, recently a couple of my papers have completely flopped over. They look otherwise healthy except the stems feel like rubber.

This is only my second time bringing them outside to start the hardening process, it's been less than an hour, and it's an overcast day, temp. Is 82f and 28c.. No signs of disease, except I just noticed some brownish spots on the fatalii leaf, but otherwise the leaves look ok..

Used jiffy seed starting mix and acouple occasional feedings of liquid seaweed that's it..

Any help would be appreciated.
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Hello..don't know what zone you're in but besides warmth aka acceptable temps for me ie >60*F I follow this & tailor it to my conditions in Zone 6.

To harden off your seedlings, gradually introduce them to the outdoors.

“Take your seedlings to a protected location outside for one hour for the first day,”  “Do this each day for a week. Add one hour for each day of the process. By the end of the week, you’ll be at 7 hours and the plants will be ready to be transplanted,”
While inside, seedling stems haven’t been exposed to WINDS. Plants, like us, need to start our workouts and gradually increase the intensity to become strong. So early on in the hardening off process, provide seedlings shelter.

“Don’t put them in direct sun. Don’t put them in a windy location. Keep in mind, they are just babies.

If you want to help your plants beef-up early, you can add a fan to the area where you are storing your seedlings. Use the
to gently move the air. Too much direct breeze from a fan could dry out the seedlings and do the same damage wind would in the garden.
“Provide consistent moisture. Seedlings are susceptible to any extreme until they are established"
Good Luck. ;)
 
~
^^^^^^.....+1 to what WiriWiri posted....^^^^^^
 
Even though you posted, 
 
pr3ttibrwneyez said:
This is only my second time bringing them outside to start the hardening process, it's been less than an hour, and it's an overcast day, temp. Is 82f and 28c.. No signs of disease, except I just noticed some brownish spots on the fatalii leaf, but otherwise the leaves look ok..
Review Reaper help, leaf tan and note the arrows in your pic I modified below.....
 
dk3DOiz.jpg

 
Looks light sunlight/shadows to me?

And at 82°F that's too much in my opinion....
 
wiriwiri said:
Hello..don't know what zone you're in but besides warmth aka acceptable temps for me ie >60*F I follow this & tailor it to my conditions in Zone 6.

To harden off your seedlings, gradually introduce them to the outdoors.

“Take your seedlings to a protected location outside for one hour for the first day,”  “Do this each day for a week. Add one hour for each day of the process. By the end of the week, you’ll be at 7 hours and the plants will be ready to be transplanted,”
While inside, seedling stems haven’t been exposed to WINDS. Plants, like us, need to start our workouts and gradually increase the intensity to become strong. So early on in the hardening off process, provide seedlings shelter.

“Don’t put them in direct sun. Don’t put them in a windy location. Keep in mind, they are just babies.

If you want to help your plants beef-up early, you can add a fan to the area where you are storing your seedlings. Use the
to gently move the air. Too much direct breeze from a fan could dry out the seedlings and do the same damage wind would in the garden.
“Provide consistent moisture. Seedlings are susceptible to any extreme until they are established"
Good Luck. ;)
Thank you, I do use a fan. Most of my seedlings look amazing! That's part of the reason I was so confused. I usually start fanning once I see true leaves.. I have an oscillating fan I set on low and aim high so it brushes across the tops.. I'm in zone 6b.. we have another 2 weeks till plant date. I usually go by the date our local conservatory gives which is after may 15th.

It's been pretty rainy and overcast for the last week and the forecast is for rain for the next week.. So im going to try to still bring them out..

Question is, these days are all overcast, so if i don't get full sun during the hardening process, should I extend it or go ahead and plant?

I'm also wondering if it's a watering issue. Im top watering cause im using 3.5inch deep pots and after sitting in water for more than an hour, the tops still looked dry.. so i started top watering whenever the top looks really dry..

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The_NorthEast_ChileMan said:
~
^^^^^^.....+1 to what WiriWiri posted....^^^^^^
 
Even though you posted, 
 

Review Reaper help, leaf tan and note the arrows in your pic I modified below.....
 
dk3DOiz.jpg

 
Looks light sunlight/shadows to me?

And at 82°F that's too much in my opinion....
Hmmm ok.. we have some overcast days coming up so I'll limit the time they're out and monitor them for the next couple days. Hopefully they recover! Thank you for replying!

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Are you putting the plants in bigger containers or in the ground? I use  around Memorial Day to plant out...maybe a few days before
a streak of warm days before the Memorial day...you won't want to  go from no or little sun on the plants to full sun,then they will react negatively.
Just keep an eye on the temps/sun..I don't see any sun here till next Monday...so I'm in the same plight as you.
Re: the plants looking dry...
Many potting soils become hydrophobic—tending to repel water—when they dry out, and are difficult to re-wet. we may see water draining out the bottom of a pot and assume that means that the soil is saturated. But the water might be running between the side of the pot and the hydrophobic root ball instead, barely wetting the outer surface and leaving the center of the root ball dead dry. Small seedlings from nurseries are particularly prone to this, especially if they have become root bound. It can happen to large container plants as well.Potting soils often contains peat moss which is valued because it decomposes slowly, is lightweight, and retains water. Paradoxically though, when peat moss dries out it is very difficult to re-wet...
We will get better weather soon...so don't worry too much. keep them going for a few short weeks.good luck. :P
 
 
 
wiriwiri said:
Are you putting the plants in bigger containers or in the ground?
Re: the plants looking dry...
Many potting soils become hydrophobic—tending to repel water—when they dry out, and are difficult to re-wet. we may see water draining out the bottom of a pot and assume that means that the soil is saturated. But the water might be running between the side of the pot and the hydrophobic root ball instead, barely wetting the outer surface and leaving the center of the root ball dead dry. Small seedlings from nurseries are particularly prone to this, especially if they have become root bound. It can happen to large container plants as well.Potting soils often contains peat moss which is valued because it decomposes slowly, is lightweight, and retains water. Paradoxically though, when peat moss dries out it is very difficult to re-wet...
We will get better weather soon...so don't worry too much. keep them going for a few short weeks.good luck. [emoji14]
 
 
Hi, Thanks a lot! Im really wondering if thats is what's happening, the root ball, I remember thinking a couple times while watering, "wow, that's running through really quick" but not thinking anything of it. This weekend im definitely going to slide a few of the worse culprits out and check.. I'm too impatient to wait for memorial day. Usually, I wait till the first weekend after the 15th, but currently my plant out day is the 11th.

The hot peppers I'm going to put in 5 gallon food grade buckets, and a couple root pouches, this is my first year doing that, I usually plant in a raised bed. This is also my first year for topping the plant, any suggestions on fertilizer or watering or anything would be appreciated. I could push back my plant out date for the peppers in the buckets, but my tomatoes are very stressed, i'll just put them in and use a cover if needed. I know buckets won't hold warmth as well tho.

Thanks again!



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pr3ttibrwneyez said:
The hot peppers I'm going to put in 5 gallon food grade buckets, and a couple root pouches, this is my first year doing that, I usually plant in a raised bed. This is also my first year for topping the plant, any suggestions on fertilizer or watering or anything would be appreciated.
wiriwiri said:
Many potting soils become hydrophobic—tending to repel water—when they dry out, and are difficult to re-wet. we may see water draining out the bottom of a pot and assume that means that the soil is saturated. But the water might be running between the side of the pot and the hydrophobic root ball instead, barely wetting the outer surface and leaving the center of the root ball dead dry. Small seedlings from nurseries are particularly prone to this, especially if they have become root bound. It can happen to large container plants as well.Potting soils often contains peat moss which is valued because it decomposes slowly, is lightweight, and retains water. Paradoxically though, when peat moss dries out it is very difficult to re-wet...
I'd like to start by adding/clarifying to WiriWiri's great post. First is I don't like the term potting soil as it can be confused with potting mix or potting media. When I think of soil I think of garden soil which should never be used in outdoor pots no mater how amended IMO. Next is, "become hydrophobic—tending to repel water—when they dry out, and are difficult to re-wet." which I fought for years until I added a fairly large quantity of perlite to my growing media. While vermiculite retains water I like to make sure my media is dry so if I'm adding nutes that's what the roots are absorbing.
 
 As always, YMMV
 
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