flavor pepper taste map

Different peppers hit the taste buds differently. I know habaneros get me in the back of my throat while black pepper is right in the mouth. Also, some peppers tend to have delayed heat onset while others are right away.
Anyone ever seen a map that shows where each pepper variety hits the senses and the heat onset? That sure would be a terrific reference. (all I've ever seen is the scoville heat scale)
 
Must say that I've never heard of a mouth map. It is always an interesting conversation when discussing this subject with chilehead friends.
Sauces do the same type of thing. Red Savina sauces hit me on every surface. Cajohn's Fatalii Puree only affects my tounge, while the rest of the mouth feels normal. My wife isn't affected at all by the Fatalii, while a quality Red Sav sauce is over the top in terms of heat for her, I can't figure that one out.
 
I find the habs hit the back of the throat a lot while scotch bonnets hit more the front or sides of the mouth. Very interesting topic for those trying to blend flavors and heat levels.
 
Capsaicin is actually 5 compounds called capsaicinoids that have distinctly different 'tastes' and effects. Each chile variety has different levels and combinations of these compounds, which explains why some people can handle fatalii but not savina, etc. My girlfriend can handle only so much jalapeno and serrano, but can match any serious hab-head pod for pod. I think the tongue-map is a great idea! It would make a good fridge magnet or poster. brookthecook
 
The worst pepper I have ever had for burn was a Black Pearl. Felt like the skin was getting ripped off the middle of my tounge. Yet my Carribean Red I grow is about as punchless as my 13 year old housecat. Dunno, kinda odd.
 
I have seen the idea discussed but never graphically. brookthecook can you site your source? I knew that also but have no idea where I learned it.
 
imaguitargod said:
Ok, I don't get the backwards or funny bit, but it is true. :hell:

Black pepper was around first. A crazy Italian, working for Spain, thought he was in the Indies. He took some pepper plants, probably piquin, back to Europe with him. It was called red pepper either as a genuine mis-understanding or some believe as a marketing ploy against the ubiquitous peppercorn.
 
I have seen the idea discussed but never graphically. brookthecook can you site your source? I knew that also but have no idea where I learned it.
Lessee-NMSU (Chile Pepper Inst.) or Texas A&M would have detailed info on the different capsaicinoids, although I don't know if anyone's 'mapped' the tongue for these compounds. That's a good place to start, or maybe some of the growers in the Netherlands, they're pretty intense botanists. brookthecook
 
Black pepper was around first. A crazy Italian, working for Spain, thought he was in the Indies. He took some pepper plants, probably piquin, back to Europe with him. It was called red pepper either as a genuine mis-understanding or some believe as a marketing ploy against the ubiquitous peppercorn
.
The Portuguese helped with the confusion: There's a plant with red 'peppercorns' from Africa they called Melegueta (known in Elizabethan England) and a Brazilian peqin-type they called Malagueta. Yikes! brookthecook
 
Yeah the black pearl is a beautiful plant. But as far as taste, it is nothing special. A lot of different peppers are hotter and effect the whole mouth. That black pearl, like I said was like ripping the skin off the center of my tounge. Wierd, and not good.
 
I just received/stole some seeds from the Cleveland Zoo for the Black Pearl...I'm going to plant them this year and overwinter them.
 
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