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flavor Searching for a exotic tasting chili that is not to spicy (Indoor)

Hey,

i have an growing tent (2*4) and searching for a exotic tasting chili.
I love the Aji Amarillo.

I have it from a shop from the NL and it has a good spaciness.
Not to hot but also not completely mild.
Good for make it on bread and also tasty in Chili Sin Carne.

I am thinking about to just growing these chili plant but I am not sure if there are any chili that is better for growing indoor in a tent.
I never was growing an baccatum I think but I think that it needs much of pace which is of course not that practical for a 2*4 growing tent.

I dont want an annum, the taste is for me to boring.

So I am actually searching for a compact chili, good tasting and not that spicy than a Habanero but also not to mild.

Thanks and greetings
Saphira :)
 
I use 4x2 foot tents and tables indoors and I find I'm able to control the size of many pepper types to fit indoors. They don't produce as much as they would in bigger containers, but with a final container size of approximately 2.5 liters they develop into reasonably sized indoor plants. I find generally that the more depth provided in the container, the taller and bigger the plant will grow.

Right now, I have several baccatum growing. I find some want to grow too tall even with pruning, but others conform well when kept in smaller containers. Aji Amarillo is an example of a baccatum that seems to want to grow tall more than wide. Aji Guyana, however, grows very well indoors creating a small bush. I haven't grown aji lemon/limon/lemon drop/pineapple indoors, but I've grown it outdoors and think it would grow more like the guyana than the amarillo, so be a good choice.

Many chinense will grow to an appropriate size when kept in small containers. I have a Bahamian Goat and various scotch bonnets and habanero types flowering inside right now, with the tallest being under 45cm including the container. From experience, I expect perhaps 8 - 18 pods from each of them when grown to this size. The pods are smaller than those of a full-sized plant, but still of reasonable size. With a tall tent, you could use slightly bigger containers if you chose and your plants would grow slightly bigger and produce more.

Once you develop your method, I think there are more peppers that will work well for you indoors than there are that will present problems. Glad to have you here at THP. Good luck with finding varieties for your grow.
 
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Hey,

thank you all very much!
I think i will write the next days more.

@CaneDog Thank you but how small (is these the correct word?) is your tent?
My tent is 4x2 foot but round about 6 foot (180cm) tall. :D
I think that the height is not the problem.

I am worrying much more about the ground size (4x2 foots).
 
My tents are the same size. If you grow on the floor of the tent (or start on a table and transfer to the floor as the plants get bigger), height won't be as much of a problem as you'll have more room available between the plants and the lights. Perhaps you could use somewhat bigger containers and get better production from bigger plants if you want that.

If you're growing taller plants indoors, you should consider that light intensity decreases exponentially with distance from the source. To reach down into the plant and not just light the top of the plant, you'll typically want an LED light for deeper penetration and LED's typically need to be higher from the tops of the plants than other lights. That may take away some of the headspace.

I often grow on a table with limited overhead room and using T5HO lighting (I use LED lighting sometimes too, when appropriate). When I grow plants indoors I'm not usually trying to get lots of pod production, just modest production and true isolated seeds. Growing small plants on a table usually works well for me. It also helps me to fit more plants into the 4x2 footprint, because the smaller plants are of lesser width.

You should be able to fit a reasonable number of plants into a 4x2 tent. Certain varieties may be more challenging to keep from getting too big, but more types of peppers will work well for you than won't work well if you control them to your specs with appropriate sized containers.
 
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and LED's typically need to be higher from the tops of the plants than other lights.
Hey,

thank you again! :)
I am wondering about these. The LED didnt get hot like a non-LED so why it must placed higher than "normal" lamps?

It is just very confusing for me and I just have to learn, I dont want to say that it is wrong what you tell me.
I think i ask you because I think that you know much more than me :D
 
I think it has a lot to do with the high brightness of the LEDs...
Yep. That's exactly what I was suggesting :)
Hey,

thank you again! :)
I am wondering about these. The LED didnt get hot like a non-LED so why it must placed higher than "normal" lamps?

It is just very confusing for me and I just have to learn, I dont want to say that it is wrong what you tell me.
I think i ask you because I think that you know much more than me :D
Sure. It's exactly as Marc said. An advantage of LED lighting is its greater efficiency, giving off more light relative to heat than many other types of lighting. Overly intense lighting can disrupt and slow plant growth even when ambient temperatures are appropriate. You may notice chlorosis in the foliage; with lighter-colored growth - especially the very new growth - and perhaps even lighter-colored spotting and/or a darkening, anthocyanin response often referred to as sunburn.

I often use T5HO lighting for young plants because I want some extra heat to warm the growing area. However, LED's have superior light penetration, making them advantageous as the plants get taller. They're a great option for an indoor plant's full life cycle. It just takes getting familiar with your LED's and your indoor grow environment.
 
I can confirm everything MrDog wrote is true according to what I had read.
Normally I used my 280W HLG LED for seedlings, but I often got the exact response as CaneDog described. Chlorosis in the foliage and anthocyanin response. This year I went with my other HLG light, a little brother so to say, only 100W hanging in the top of my grow tent, and I still get some of the less preferred outcomes described above. However, not as much as before.

To your first question, I suggest a plant from the c. pubescents types of plants. Specifically Costa Rican Red.
I see you're from Germany, so I assume you have roughly (maybe a bit warmer) the same weather as here in Denmark. This means you can move it out outside even after summer. I had mine outside all the way until the frost came, it was still producing in early November.

Also the taste and heat level should be right where you want it :)
 
I mean yes its right Roctos doesn't need that much sun and temperature than others but I must put while cold temperatures (winter and so on) in the tent and they are very big when they should produce Chilis .
And I think that Rocotos makes only sense when I can get them over the winter?
 
Hmh okay, maybe i will get the Rocoto a chance.

Which sorts can you recommend?
Because the heat of Rocotos are not really comparable to other Chilis the most important thing is the good exotic flavour and that it is a good sort for the indoor growing. :)
 
Hey,

i have an growing tent (2*4) and searching for a exotic tasting chili.
I love the Aji Amarillo.

I have it from a shop from the NL and it has a good spaciness.
Not to hot but also not completely mild.
Good for make it on bread and also tasty in Chili Sin Carne.

I am thinking about to just growing these chili plant but I am not sure if there are any chili that is better for growing indoor in a tent.
I never was growing an baccatum I think but I think that it needs much of pace which is of course not that practical for a 2*4 growing tent.

I dont want an annum, the taste is for me to boring.

So I am actually searching for a compact chili, good tasting and not that spicy than a Habanero but also not to mild.

Thanks and greetings
Saphira :)
Locopica if you are looking for great tasting small flavor bombs in your mouth. If you wanted larger flavor bombs... definitely go with the Capsicum pubescens. Capsicum baccatum would be a close 3rd, but flavors do manage to very a little within any species... so that can make it a bit harder. I'm a fan of chocolate colored specimens.
 
Slightly late response but....

In my humble opinion, the Aji amarillo and the Lemon drop are quite close to each other in taste and heat. The amarillo takes forever to ripen, the lemon drop is much faster. The Aa get very tall and spindly, where the Ld is more compact (like 1/3 of the Aa's size). Seed-to-meat ratio is in the Ld's favor. I'd pick the Ld for indoor growing any time.
Exotic taste: I managed to do a baccatum x chinense cross (Aji cristal x Sc. bonnet, boy was that a difficult one!) and that taste is quite pleasant in F1, perhaps exotic. F2's are coming up this year.
 
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