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Some basics on how I hybridize without bees and a few F1 and F1BC1

1emasculate.jpg
1st, emasculate your flower before it opens.
 
2 apply some pollen
2apply pollen.jpg

 
3 pollen applied.jpg
Pollen is applied Those are the basics.... of course many will rely on bees to do their work... but then it is guess work as to what the cross really is.
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Capsicum frutescens 'Cabai Burung Ungu' x C. 'Ghost'.jpeg
C.annuum 'Variegata' x C. baccatum 'Sugar Rush Peach x (C. baccatum 'Sugar Rush Peach) F1BC1.png
VSRP x MORANGUM.jpeg
VSRP x ANA.jpeg
 

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cmpman1974 said:
Is this that guy that's on Facebook always posting about making variegated crosses?
 
Chris
One and the same, and did you notice.... that C. frutescens 'Cabai Burung Ungu' x C. 'Ghost'.... that one has zero variegation. If I get that one to sprout I'll definitely have to cross it to something with variegated genes. Preferably another interspecific hybrid!
 

texas_pepper_man

Extreme Member
I've seen this somewhere before. just can't remember where. The post I saw before had him cutting the petals off the flowers thou, but pretty much same post.
 
Chorizo857_62J said:
Very interesting and informative.
 
Thank you my friend, I find that joy in sharing information as I truly believe we would be much further along if we all shared this type of information with each other. Take the idea of freezing dried pollen in tiny microcentrifuge containers. Hybridizers have been doing that long before I was a twinkle in my dads eyes, but I how much of that type of information is shared in groups like this? And if it is, can it ever be shared enough? Personally, I wan to encourage others to get excited about what is possible.
texas_pepper_man said:
I've seen this somewhere before. just can't remember where. The post I saw before had him cutting the petals off the flowers thou, but pretty much same post.
 
You've never seen me cut petals off the flowers, I generally pinch the flower and remove the entire corolla in one or two tugs with my fingers or I'll dig into the calyx itself with my fingernails to remove the corolla and anthers prior to the flower opening as I've noticed sometimes the anthers can mature early and release pollen even before the flower opens.
 
You would be surprised at how many people miss these simple basics. I recently saw one fellow posting seed for sale from a cross he made. He posted pictures where the flowers were never emasculated, but were clearly marked with the pollen donor applied to the stigma of each flower.
 
The problem with that is of course is that sometimes a flower can pollinate itself even before it opens, but it has a much higher chance of doing so if you actually let the flower open and then pollinate it.
 
So, you'll see a lot of repetition with me as I truly want people to get the details that are so important to hybridizing. These details are not so easy believe it or not or we would see far less 'uncertain' hybrids out there and those that were bee pollinated while they might still exist... I think more people have fun and are willing to invest more time into those hybrids where they actually know what is hidden in them. 
 
If you don't know you have recessive variegation hidden in a cross or a recessive immature white color gene in the fruit... are you going to try to get that gene to surface? How would you? You'd likely just toss it and definitely wouldn't know enough to backcross to the variegated parent if the variegated parent was from the pollen donor side and from a bee rather than your own hand.
Ruid said:
You're one of the most informative and fun new members. Please stick around.
Thanks my friend, I intend to make a splash of excitement as I show what is possible and ask questions like why aren't others doing this? 
 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnDv23rimrQ
 

texas_pepper_man

Extreme Member
PollenNut said:
 
Thank you my friend, I find that joy in sharing information as I truly believe we would be much further along if we all shared this type of information with each other. Take the idea of freezing dried pollen in tiny microcentrifuge containers. Hybridizers have been doing that long before I was a twinkle in my dads eyes, but I how much of that type of information is shared in groups like this? And if it is, can it ever be shared enough? Personally, I wan to encourage others to get excited about what is possible.
 
You've never seen me cut petals off the flowers, I generally pinch the flower and remove the entire corolla in one or two tugs with my fingers or I'll dig into the calyx itself with my fingernails to remove the corolla and anthers prior to the flower opening as I've noticed sometimes the anthers can mature early and release pollen even before the flower opens.
 
You would be surprised at how many people miss these simple basics. I recently saw one fellow posting seed for sale from a cross he made. He posted pictures where the flowers were never emasculated, but were clearly marked with the pollen donor applied to the stigma of each flower.
 
The problem with that is of course is that sometimes a flower can pollinate itself even before it opens, but it has a much higher chance of doing so if you actually let the flower open and then pollinate it.
 
So, you'll see a lot of repetition with me as I truly want people to get the details that are so important to hybridizing. These details are not so easy believe it or not or we would see far less 'uncertain' hybrids out there and those that were bee pollinated while they might still exist... I think more people have fun and are willing to invest more time into those hybrids where they actually know what is hidden in them. 
 
If you don't know you have recessive variegation hidden in a cross or a recessive immature white color gene in the fruit... are you going to try to get that gene to surface? How would you? You'd likely just toss it and definitely wouldn't know enough to backcross to the variegated parent if the variegated parent was from the pollen donor side and from a bee rather than your own hand.
Thanks my friend, I intend to make a splash of excitement as I show what is possible and ask questions like why aren't others doing this? 
 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnDv23rimrQ
I stand corrected about seeing this post before. Here is the one I saw
https://www.fatalii.net/Growing_chile_peppers/Breeding
 
Yeah, it's best to remove the stamens before they start producing pollen. I remove them with forceps right before the flower opens. You gotta be careful you don't damage the pistol and stigma. I've done this back when I grew hundreds of plants and emasculated while it was scorching hot. You can remove the petals or glue them shut. I typically remove them and use a hand lens to view the stigma while placing pollen on it. You will see the pollen stick to the stigma when it's ready.
 
Dulac said:
Yeah, it's best to remove the stamens before they start producing pollen. I remove them with forceps right before the flower opens. You gotta be careful you don't damage the pistol and stigma. I've done this back when I grew hundreds of plants and emasculated while it was scorching hot. You can remove the petals or glue them shut. I typically remove them and use a hand lens to view the stigma while placing pollen on it. You will see the pollen stick to the stigma when it's ready.
I've actually found flowers with pollen that has ripened even before the flower opens, but then I've also seen flowers on the same plant not have any pollen even after the flower opens.
 
As for damaging the pistil...  you can actually cut the stigma off completely... this is called cut style or mutilated style pollination and is done to bypass barriers in the stigma. Often times one might spray the cut pistil with a solution of glucose and salicylic acid right before the pollination. 
 
More advanced techniques include grafting different stigmas to the pistil one is working on... pollen cocktails, dilutions, mentor pollen techniques....
 
As a resource for those who are growing out the seed you have passed out, would you be willing to do a video of your flower selection and hybridizing process? While it might be a bit of a rehash for more experienced growers, it might also help reinforce some of the fundamentals, as well as help those growing out your crosses to better emulate your specific controlled process.
 
Edaxflamma said:
 
As a resource for those who are growing out the seed you have passed out, would you be willing to do a video of your flower selection and hybridizing process? While it might be a bit of a rehash for more experienced growers, it might also help reinforce some of the fundamentals, as well as help those growing out your crosses to better emulate your specific controlled process.
 
 
For those growing out my seed, they need only isolate the flower to ensure the flower self-pollinates.
 
I've used many techniques to do this myself, but to make it very simple.... this method of isolation is very easy.
BudGluing for isolated seed .png
 
This video shows a method of marking a cross that often works well for me, but accidents can happen which is why I am sharing this video. I will often label the leaf connecting the to cross and put a mark on the peduncle itself when the peduncle or leaf is light enough to allow a mark to show from a black sharpie. 
 
I'll look for some of my hybridizing videos for you guys as well since an interest in videos of that was presented. I have a few different techniques I use for that as well that may help some of you out.
 
https://youtu.be/L2MSjUZcANI
 
How I collect for storage in the freezer. Many hybridizers will dilute pollen 1 part pollen to 4 parts flower to reduce moisture content which is a killer of pollen... especially so if you freeze your pollen which I do.
 
 
This short clip is important for those using microcentrifuge tubes to store their pollen simply because you need to know how to get your pollen back so you can apply it to the stigma of your pistil later.
 
This video shows a few tricks I use to make this easy. I think many of you would intuit how to do this if given a few minutes... this saves some time.
 
https://youtu.be/JtxKFVa2i1k
 
Exactly what I was hoping someone had done! Amazing choice on the backing track as well haha. Thanks to both PollenNut and Pepper-Guru for that! I now have a few more channels to follow.
 
What is an f2?
 
"Next, he showed that self-pollinated F1 plants (or cross- pollinated with other F1 plants) produce an F2 generation with 3/4 of the plants tall and 1/4 short."
 
http://www.indiana.edu/~p1013447/dictionary/mendel.htm
 
 
This my friends is not an f2 below. But it does share with you how you should think about your crosses. You have to plan for the traits you want to see expressed in your f2. With the below seed, you will get a 50% chance of getting a heterozygous variegated seedling... meaning you should not see variegation until the f2 or next generation.
 
https://youtu.be/Ag7R9IR4NfU
 
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