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Tepin x Lemon Drop F6

cone9

Extreme Member
This is my Tepin x Lemon Drop.  I believe this year is F6.   These are always vigorous growers and flush with peppers.
 
I have been growing them since smileyguy697 send me pods from his F1 plant.  Each year I save seed from the largest pods. 
 
The F1 pods were a little less than an inch long.  The peppers have been getting slightly larger with each generation.  This year they were a bigger (pun intended) surprise.
 

 
If you look really close you can see a few peppers

 

 
This is the first to ripen - picked this morning

 
...for scale

 
money shot

(That is probably a tiny Alex hair on the left shoulder - a fine seasoning for eggs)
 
alongside the blade

 
diced up with Guggisberg Swiss cheese, baby Pak Choy, cherry tomatoes and eggs...

 
destined to become...

A SNOWCONE!
 
no, no, no....wrong pic.
 
destined to become...

BREAKFAST!!!!!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
That's my kind of breakfast! I really loved these when I first grew them, not sure how they did not end up on my list this year. Oh well next year. Thanks for the reminder. 
 

Edmick

Staff Member
Moderator
Extreme Member
Nice. Mine didn't make it this year unfortunately. Was looking forward to it too.
 

cone9

Extreme Member
Thanks all for you comments.
 
SpeakPolish said:
It's a beautiful pod. Looks more like a baccatum. How'd the flowers look like?
 
I'll post pics below.
AndyW said:
I think it's really cool how thick the walls are considering the parents.
I have never had a Tepin pepper, but perhaps the thick flesh comes from it.
 
 
Here are pics of a flower on my Lemon Drop plant:


 
 
And here is a flower from the Tepin x Lemon Drop plant:



 
The quality of the crop of just the flower is not the best as was taken with my phone.
 
Holy hell I wish any of my peppers were that big. Just curious if alot of people over winter plants or grow them fresh from seed each season?, assuming you live in an area with hard winters.
 

cone9

Extreme Member
I start from seed in Jan. or Feb. - indoors, under lights.  I get the plants in the ground around the middle of May.  I am in northeast Ohio.  They languish for a couple weeks until the nights are consistently warm enough to allow good growth.  Then the magic happens!
 
What you see in my garden/pots is ten weeks in the ground.  
 
Obviously, the middle of May is too early for you but once you're comfortably frost free you are good to hit the dirt.  Second or third week of June, maybe??
 
Overwintering has not worked well for me.  Too cumbersome to save very many plants.  I did one C. pube from last year which, at present, is way behind the plants grown from seed and not yet even in flower.  I tried one a couple years ago and it got me a severe aphid problem in my grow room.  It works well for some, but so far not for me.
 
Look for some THP members in northern Minnesota - muskymojo is one - for some advice closer to your climate.  Best of luck.
 
 
 
cone9 said:
I start from seed in Jan. or Feb. - indoors, under lights.  I get the plants in the ground around the middle of May.  I am in northeast Ohio.  They languish for a couple weeks until the nights are consistently warm enough to allow good growth.  Then the magic happens!
 
What you see in my garden/pots is ten weeks in the ground.  
 
Obviously, the middle of May is too early for you but once you're comfortably frost free you are good to hit the dirt.  Second or third week of June, maybe??
 
Overwintering has not worked well for me.  Too cumbersome to save very many plants.  I did one C. pube from last year which, at present, is way behind the plants grown from seed and not yet even in flower.  I tried one a couple years ago and it got me a severe aphid problem in my grow room.  It works well for some, but so far not for me.
 
Look for some THP members in northern Minnesota - muskymojo is one - for some advice closer to your climate.  Best of luck.
 
 
 
This year was a big test year for me even though I have been gardening for about 12-13 years now ( 5-6 of that strictly flowers) The past 4 years or so I started saving my own seed and doing my own heirloom stuff with bell pepppers and other vegis/flowers and would start them indoors like alot of peps in jiffy pots or simple seed starting kits ect.
 
This winter however I built a couple grow boxes and started growing in early January...I should had concentrated on specific things like my peppers and new found chillis but I was all over the map playing around. This made it difficult once things started to outgrow the starter trays and pots, but I did learn alot about expectations as far as starting stuff early in the winter and bought some decent lighting gear to do so.
 
And you could not be more right about the climate its really buggered around here...mind you the end of May is a normal target to shoot for esp the past 10 years or so with climate change becoming more and more noticible. Sadly this year we went right from minus Celcius temps to +20c in a matter of a week or so , there really was not much of a spring or a chance to get my plants into the portable greenhouse I have to climatize to outdoor temps and the sun.
 
I am actually looking forward to this winter and concentrating solely on my peppers for the first few months and then tomatos which I grow maybe 10 diff types as well. I think as far as winter goes I may try a few plants just to see if I am able and again to experiment to see how they are compared to plants started by seed come the growing season.
But thanks for the advice and plants look fantastic!!
 
 
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