preservation to former and current smokers and vapers

I never really ate peppers much or used any sauces other than taco bell sauces before I started smoking cigarettes so I only have current observations here.... about two months ago, I quit smoking and started vaping. Since then, I've been noticing I feel a stronger mouth burn than before from pods and sauces.... that makes sense because supposedly cigarettes have/produce slight numbing effects in the mouth and throat so you don't feel what it does.... and reduces the abilty to taste, but taste has nothing to do with the intensity of the burn from pods, correct? Aside from that, I've been noticing more reactions to pods and sauces in my stomach, more an intense uncomfortable feeling than pain since I quit smoking....

To those who used to smoke, did you experience similar results before and after? And to those who ate peppers or sauces before smoking, did the sensations of heat lessen after starting smoking?
 
That`s interesting. I know that a lot of the nerves that have the nicotine receptors also have capsaicin receptors, so it`s possible the nicotine is "desensitizing" the nerve response to capsaicin. However, since you are getting nicotine via the vapour electronic cigarettes, that does`t really sound right. It is entirely possible that the mode of delivery - smoke vs vapour has a significant effect. Cigarette smoke is also full of stuff other than just nicotine, so the effect could be a general one due to the smoke and have little to do with nicotine. 
 
Its not the nicotine, although in trace amounts, it is present in tomatoes and some peppers, as well.... maybe since I'm getting more nicotine from vaping than from smoking, it increases the sensation?
 
rhm3769 said:
Its not the nicotine, although in trace amounts, it is present in tomatoes and some peppers, as well.... maybe since I'm getting more nicotine from vaping than from smoking, it increases the sensation?
If you chew nicotine gum, does it have any effect on your response to peppers? All nightshades have a little, but very very little by comparison to tobacco. it is very possible that the purer form of nicotine you get from vaping is acting differently to the mix in tobacco smoke. Wish I had more answers for you, but I don`t. 
 
Nigel said:
If you chew nicotine gum, does it have any effect on your response to peppers? All nightshades have a little, but very very little by comparison to tobacco. it is very possible that the purer form of nicotine you get from vaping is acting differently to the mix in tobacco smoke. Wish I had more answers for you, but I don`t. 
No idea, haven't tried. I read somewhere in an e-cig forum about everything you go through when you quit. Specifically the sore throat most experience when switching to vaping. It had been said there numerous times that cigarettes have stuff that numbs the mouth and throat to lessen how harsh the warmer smoke feels....

Not complaining about things seeming hotter than before, I can't eat pods like you.... it just means my sauces will last longer and I can make more with the same amount of peppers....
 
Oil in a liquid ti vape would be most lukely bad. Supposedly it needs modifications to work that way as well.... and there is a jalapeno flavored juice out there that a few have claimed is like vaporizing pepper spray....
 
I stopped smoking 6 weeks ago.  I have not noticed a change in "burnosity" but I have become more sensitive to smells and tastes.  If I had to guess I would say I might have become more sensitive to capcaisin but it has occurred over time so I personally have not noticed.
 
BTW - I took a month off coffee and any alcohol as those were my downfall on my previous attempt to quit. Nicotine patches helped me a lot but gave me such wild dreams I would wake up knacked. It got to the point I was dreaming detailed aspects of my work and it was only over the following days I would realize I had dreamed a specification or a graph and not actually read them. I would almost suggest them for recreational use if you like crazy dreams and don't have a lot to do the next day.  Apparently the effects are the same on smokers and non-smokers.
 
Makes sense.... I probably noticed it more because I don't use pods or sauces all the time. ... ill go days where meals are planned around my sauces and then followed by days where I don't use anything.... it isn't much of an increase in heat, but enough where I notice it....
 
Ive been vaping and traditional cigarette free for a little over a year. Unfortunatly I didnt really get into eating peppers until about six months ago other than jalapeños so no help here.
 
1.) If you are consuming more peppers now as opposed to the past, you should have more burn to the mouth and the stomach, regardless of your chosen method of nicotine delivery. You may be associating the changes with what you recently did differently with your mouth, that is you may be attributing smoking/vaping to your more intense sensory experiences when actually you have changed your pepper consumption. Are you consuming more peppers or more hotter peppers now?
2.) You should also be tasting everything more intensely when vaping as opposed to smoking. Are you consuming more foods or a greater variety of foods now?
3.) A cigarette tends to deliver 0.5-2.0mg nicotine. That is a standard dose with a 30 minute half life, which means that if you smoked full strength cigs you would get a dose, then need another in about 3 hours if you were physically addicted. If you smoked "lights", you would smoke more often to get the full dose. How you smoked (how hard you puffed the cigarette, how long or deeply you inhaled) would greatly affect dosage and usage, as well as side effects. Are your vaping juices within the same range? You probably are getting a different dosage, and thus different side effects, from your new delivery method.
 
Nothing has changed.... because of the way I smoked, I'm vaping a higher nicotine concentration than what I would get from smoking.... other than that, I guess the wider variety of flavors for vaping compared to cigarettes is different....
 
rhm3769 said:
Oil in a liquid ti vape would be most lukely bad. Supposedly it needs modifications to work that way as well.... and there is a jalapeno flavored juice out there that a few have claimed is like vaporizing pepper spray....
Oil is okay in e liquids. You just need to use it in very small amounts. Most oils are so potent that it takes less than two percent to produce a very strong flavor (For instance, my dreamsicle liquid recipe uses .5% orange oil). If you use a large ratio of vegetable glycerin (A common base liquid) in your mix, you will need to add a small bit of ethyl alcohol to emulsify the oil. There is also a capsaicin "flavor" on the market. I've tried it, and it's very similar to breathing in the fumes of superhots when you throw them in a hot pan. Personally I don't like it.
 
ms1476 said:
Those are very high dosages, lol. Suddenly I feel less guilty about my smoking habit...
Those dosages seem very high, but the nicotine absorption rate is much smaller in e cigs. There are certain chemicals (MAOI's, etc) produced in cigarette smoke that aid the absorption of nicotine, so it is taken in by your body much easier. Some of these chemicals are actually much worse for you than nicotine, which is why real cigarettes are so much worse than even high nicotine vaping.
 
Sorry for getting off topic. I just couldn't help myself, my two favorite hobbies just converged in one thread lol. The only thing I can think of that would cause the heightened burn with vaping would be some disruption to the protective barriers in your mouth. When you eat foods that disrupt this barrier (such as very salty or acidic foods) you do get a stronger burn. Perhaps there is something in the e liquid which is altering the environment in your mouth. Most e liquids are pretty acidic, which could be the cause. I personally didn't notice a difference when I quite smoking and started vaping. I was able to taste much better but the burn was the same.  
 
Smoking is a very fast method of absorption due to the base environment of the lungs (basic environment is faster absorption than acidic environment when the drug is basic, like cigarette smoke). Wouldn't inhaling vapor still enter the lungs in order to get into the bloodstream? When you say MAOIs do you mean the drugs that inhibit mono amine oxidase? MAO is an enzyme that clears a synaptic channel, not a chemical produced in smoke. I'm just wondering how vapor could differ from smoke in absorption, having studied the subject quite extensively...
thirdcoasttx said:
36 is pretty high 24 is about what is in a marlboro red 18 would be a light so on and so forth
36mg of nicotine, if ingested, would put an average human in the hospital. Rarely does a cigarette exceed 2mg. Generally, they average a tad bit over 1 mg each. One would feel very ill if they consumed 36 cigarettes at the exact same moment...

EDIT: Were you referring to the article that found lower MAO A and MAO B in rats from cigarette chemicals other than nicotine alone? If so, I got you now. The chemicals other than nicotine act as MAOIs. That is interesting. The nasty "other chemicals" would then contribute to increased pleasure, and thus be more addictive. That is terrible, but interesting.
 
The carriers of nicotine in analogs aee much smaller so nicotine penetrates deeper into the lungs for absorption.... the carriers produced vaping prevent this deep penetration, therefore lung inhalation is not absolutely required.... it is more readily absorbed in the mouth, throat and nose....

Most of the reason I dropped to 24 is a lot of the vendors I've looked at only carry 24, else I'd have stayed at 30.... 36 is too strong for as much as I vape, but it got me passed the harder days with quitting....
maybe I've just been getting those abnormally hotter pods and using more sauces than normal.... yiu regain taste, but I've been finding some things don't have as much of a taste or is off from what I remember....
 
Drugs are slower to absorb when administered orally, so the dosage of vaping is huge in order to adjust. Makes sense. Hope you enjoy your new-found taste buds soon. Take care.

-Mark
 
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