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All about soil - A great resource I thought I would share


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#201 CanadaChili

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 09:58 AM

I always figured compost would make my mix too "muddy" texturally but i understand the other benefits. I'm aiming to have a mostly inert mix fertilizer-wise (I know loam carries some). Where I live we usually get a very soggy/cold June and that's where i find my mixes to sponge all kinds of water and the plants become sickly.

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Edited by CanadaChili, 23 July 2018 - 10:06 AM.

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#202 karoo

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 10:23 AM

I always figured compost would make my mix too "muddy" texturally but i understand the other benefits. I'm aiming to have a mostly inert mix fertilizer-wise (I know loam carries some). Where I live we usually get a very soggy/cold June and that's where i find my mixes to sponge all kinds of water and the plants become sickly.

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 I think we might be close to opposite sides of the globe and the weather spectrum. :party:

 

Hot and dry over here . Today , MID-WINTER , we have a bit of a heatwave , 20 Celsius minimum and 31 Celsius maximum.

 

Enjoy the grow.


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#203 CanadaChili

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 11:01 AM

Sure sounds like it. Are you Aussie?

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#204 solid7

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 05:20 PM

I hate to necro this thread but I'm relatively new to customizing soil mixes. In the past i would have settled for only promix general purpose for example and would encounter drainage issues throughout the summer. I'm looking to create something that is light, yet has some capacity to hold onto nutrients that I'll be supplementing myself. Would this mix offer adequate drainage?

1 part peat moss
1 part perlite
1 part topsoil/loam
Thanks in advance!

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Is this for containers or raised beds?

 

If it's for containers, then topsoil has no place.  If it's for raised beds, then yes.

 

It's much better to use small amounts of compost or composted manure in containers.  Something on the order of 5%.  It REALLY doesn't take much.  And if you want a great performing mix, that works well for containers in just about any condition, then make it something like this:

 

7 parts coco coir or peat moss

3 parts perlite

1 part compost, vermicompost, or composted manure

 

And that's it.  You're done.

You can also take the above mix, and add up to 50% pine bark fines.  Just helps extend the mix a bit further, without sacrificing the properties that you are looking for.


Edited by solid7, 05 August 2018 - 05:21 PM.

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#205 CanadaChili

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 08:19 PM

 
Is this for containers or raised beds?
 
If it's for containers, then topsoil has no place.  If it's for raised beds, then yes.
 
It's much better to use small amounts of compost or composted manure in containers.  Something on the order of 5%.  It REALLY doesn't take much.  And if you want a great performing mix, that works well for containers in just about any condition, then make it something like this:
 
7 parts coco coir or peat moss
3 parts perlite
1 part compost, vermicompost, or composted manure
 
And that's it.  You're done.
You can also take the above mix, and add up to 50% pine bark fines.  Just helps extend the mix a bit further, without sacrificing the properties that you are looking for.

It'll be for 5 gallon containers. Thank you so much for the advice again.

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#206 KingLeerUK

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 01:09 PM

This will be the first year I'm planting in fabric pots.  My proposed soil mix (per 7 gallon pot):

 

Vigoro garden soil: 1/2 bag (0.5 cu.ft)
Coco coir: 1/2 brick expanded ~ 0.3 cu.ft
Black Kow compost: 1/4 bag (0.25 cu.ft)
dolomitic lime: 2 cups  ~1.5 pounds
course perlite: 1/5 bag (0.10 cu.ft)
vermiculite: 1/10 bag (0.05 cu.ft)
greensand: 1/2 cup
azomite 1/2 cup
biochar 1/8 gallon  2 cups
earthworm castings 1/2 cup

These amendments are subject to variability in amount, but probably not more than 1-2 Tbsp each to start, erring on the side of too little versus too much.
kelp meal
blood meal
bone meal
humic acid
myco granules
 
Thoughts?  This is definitely the kitchen sink approach, but I want to make the most of what season I have left here in Florida and set the plants up to be in a good spot for overwintering.

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#207 solid7

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 02:13 PM

Way too heavy, especially down here. Get rid of black cow and Vigoro. Potting soil shouldn't go in containers.
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#208 KingLeerUK

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 02:38 PM

Way too heavy, especially down here. Get rid of black cow and Vigoro. Potting soil shouldn't go in containers.

 

My thinking was that these are fabric bags, the entire surface will be exposed so evaporation will be a concern.  The coir, perlite and greensand are measures against compaction and will end up being about 50% of the volume for each fabric pot.


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#209 solid7

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Posted 17 August 2018 - 03:06 PM

Coir and perlite will not prevent compaction.
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#210 Mr. West

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Posted 01 September 2018 - 09:41 AM

For my next transplant, seedlings/young plants will be going from half pint plastic cups (containing MG seed starting mix) into quart size styrofoam cups with many small holes punched in the bottom & sides for air pruning. I'm going to use these materials:
8 qt. MG sphagnum
8 qt. MG perlite
6.6 qt. Better Gro premium grade orchid moss
8 qt. Better Gro orchid bark
4 qt. Sta Green vermiculite
I think it will be a very friable mix, with various pore sizes and balanced structure.

#211 solid7

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Posted 02 September 2018 - 03:14 PM

I'm sure that it will be good, but it will be unnecessarily complex and expensive...

It's really hard to beat a base of perlite or Coco, mixed with perlite. (apprx 75/25)
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#212 solid7

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Posted 02 September 2018 - 03:15 PM

Also, everything labeled MG has fertilizer in it, including the perlite. I'm guessing that you're ok with that, though...
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#213 Mr. West

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Posted 02 September 2018 - 09:29 PM

Also, everything labeled MG has fertilizer in it, including the perlite. I'm guessing that you're ok with that, though...


What's funny is the perlite contains more fertilizer than the sphagnum. I think this mix will promote strong root growth in containers. The orchid products should last over a year, retaining their structural properties through several more pot-ups before degrading into humus.

#214 Ruid

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 10:50 PM






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