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Santuko, what's it good for?


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#1 Datil Patch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 08:49 AM

Ok so I bought into this Santuko craze a few years ago cause all the chefs on the foodnetwork were raving about them, but what are they good for? Do they have a special use? I mean- I use a chef's knife, a fillet knife, several paring knives, a old utility knife, a large utility knife and a fish knife. I have 4 or 5 of these things and I don't really find they have a significantly better use than what I have always used. So what am I missing?
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#2 JayT

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 10:49 AM

I have two and I love them. They are great for chopping, then scooping everything up and putting it in a pan. Not as bulky as a chef's knife either.

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#3 ajijoe

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 10:59 AM

ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING, SAY IT AGAIN HUH!! :rofl:

sorry i couldn't resist im a little :crazy:

well from my experiences there great for most applications but it also has to do with the size
i use one for a bunch of things including seed extraction from peppers works wonderfully as
the curved tip seems to help with better control and it removes the entire placenta quick and cleanly and excellent in chopping and slicing meat thinly


hope this helps a little
thanks your friend Joe

Edited by ajijoe, 25 July 2011 - 11:03 AM.

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#4 Datil Patch

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 12:18 PM

thanks. from reviewing some Utubes, it really looks like just an gussied up Chinese cleaver.
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#5 spankyswrekdagn

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 08:17 PM

its doesnt feel in the hand or operate the same as a cleaver with a flat edge but if you get a good one that feels good in your hand and has a good weight its chops just as well. awesome for precision slicing and everything else. I own one and use it for about everything except when I need my small paring knife or boning/filet knife.

#6 JuanH

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Posted 07 September 2011 - 06:39 PM

I have 3 Santoku knives and I love them.
I use them mostly for chopping vegetables, and chopping garlic and onions is very easy eith this type of knife.
Even though they are very good, I am looking forward to buy a Japanese Bunkaboocho for cutting my peppers.
They look pretty similar but the Bunkaboocho seems even easier to handle.
BR
Jan

#7 geeme

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Posted 08 September 2011 - 08:50 PM

Interesting little thing is that my santukos seem to both get sharper and stay sharper longer than my other knives. Would love to have a FLEET of them at my disposal!

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#8 SumOfMyBits

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 07:27 PM

The santuko is the "chef knife" of Japan. I have one, but I use it less than my other knives. My chef knife gets the majority of prep work. Maybe it's the way I use my santuko... two fingers and a thumb on the blade and the ring finger and pinky around the handle. I find that's where I'm most comfortable using this knife. It's the only knife that makes me somewhat nervous while using. To me it's like using a razor-blade. When I want delicate, paper thin slices of anything, this is the go-to knife.

Geeme is right that this is a sharper knife. The angle of the edge is different.

#9 geeme

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 09:42 PM

Yeah.... When I have someone over and they want to help in the kitchen, I make a big deal out of handing them THE KNIFE. I don't actually give it to them at first, but hold it kind of on display, and give THE WARNING:

THIS WILL CUT YOU
You must be VERY careful when using it - respect the blade


People usually roll their eyes at first, and laugh a bit. Then they start using it, and about 2 secs later, you hear something to the effect of "damn, you were serious!" And possibly "Ooooooh, I never knew slicing stuff could be so much fun! You have more stuff I can cut up?"


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#10 Datil Patch

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 01:26 PM

Yeah.... When I have someone over and they want to help in the kitchen, I make a big deal out of handing them THE KNIFE. I don't actually give it to them at first, but hold it kind of on display, and give THE WARNING:

THIS WILL CUT YOU
You must be VERY careful when using it - respect the blade


People usually roll their eyes at first, and laugh a bit. Then they start using it, and about 2 secs later, you hear something to the effect of "damn, you were serious!" And possibly "Ooooooh, I never knew slicing stuff could be so much fun! You have more stuff I can cut up?"



You mean sometimes people come over and help you in the kitchen??? I live in the wrong neighborhood.

Well, mine don't stay sharp. The small Santukos are not beveled the same, and are thicker through the blade. Almost clever like. The large ones are are flat ground like chefs knives, and are very thin at the blade.
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#11 Jp1973

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Posted 07 October 2011 - 11:33 PM

I personally love Japanese knives! The ones I have are ground with only a single bevel (most western knives are double ground meaning it's sharpened on both sides of the blade). So it takes some people a while to get used to them as well as the need to have a special ordered knife if you're not right-handed.

I found that they are easy to sharpen and I can easily slice a ripe tomato so thin it only has one side per slice.

The downside to these suckers are that the edges have to be protected and they are made from plain steel at times so, they can rust. And the same with any good knife, hand wash only!

Got my first set because the kitchen I ran was small and they were on sale. Been happy with them and haven't looked back.

Hope you have fun if ya try them,
James

Edited by Jp1973, 07 October 2011 - 11:34 PM.


#12 Scoville DeVille

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 01:49 PM

ANY knife is a good knife! I love knives and kind of collect them.

Depending on what size you have I assume it's probably a 5" or 7", it doesn't really lend itself to cutting things like large squash, or even large potatoes.
If you have a 5", it's perfect for PEPPERS, green onions, mushrooms, etc., smaller veggies. The 7" will obviously be better for larger veggies, cutting up a chicken etc. If you have a hollowed blade (like scalloped),
they say it releases food better. ??? Maybe, maybe not. I think it depends on the food.

When it comes to sharpening, keeping them sharp, or staying sharp, their are a lot more factors than the name Santoku.
Use (cutting style), cutting surfaces, maintenance, storage, and food itself.

Santoku is a description, not a brand, so just because it's called Santoku, doesn't mean it will be a better knife (stay sharper longer).
The single most important factor with any knife is the steel quality. When it comes to good knives, there is generally a correlation between cost and quality. Although I have some cheap knives that I ask how did they do that for so cheap?
So that's not always literal. But when you can buy a Santoku for $20. or one for $120., I guarantee the $120 will be better, hold it's edge longer etc.
I think the worst thing for a knife edge, and I do it all the time, is scraping the chopped food to the corner of the cutting board, ugh! It's a habit I can't seem to break, so I have to sharpen my knives quite often because of that, oh well.
I personally like the laminated steel knives. Some have just a few layers, and some have up to 20 layers, and I think all are a better quality than most stainless varieties, plus they're beautiful.
If you really want a masterful tomato cutting experience, go with a ceramic Santoku or Kyocera Kyotop Damascus. It's the sharpest edge achieved by humans thus far, but only to be use for certain vegetables IMO. (like not pineapple, butternut squash etc.)
You'll pay dearly for it though as they start at $200 and can go up to what ever you want to spend, if you're rich! But would you really WANT a brand new Cadillac if it only cost $10,000? I wouldn't....

Sorry, I kind of jacked your thread! I could go on all day about knives (obviously).

Join me next week when I talk all about "Sharpening"! LOL!

#13 kauaidundee

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 02:19 PM

ANY knife is a good knife! I love knives and kind of collect them.Depending on what size you have I assume it's probably a 5" or 7", it doesn't really lend itself to cutting things like large squash, or even large potatoes.If you have a 5", it's perfect for PEPPERS, green onions, mushrooms, etc., smaller veggies. The 7" will obviously be better for larger veggies, cutting up a chicken etc. If you have a hollowed blade (like scalloped),they say it releases food better. ??? Maybe, maybe not. I think it depends on the food.When it comes to sharpening, keeping them sharp, or staying sharp, their are a lot more factors than the name Santoku.Use (cutting style), cutting surfaces, maintenance, storage, and food itself.Santoku is a description, not a brand, so just because it's called Santoku, doesn't mean it will be a better knife (stay sharper longer).The single most important factor with any knife is the steel quality. When it comes to good knives, there is generally a correlation between cost and quality. Although I have some cheap knives that I ask how did they do that for so cheap?So that's not always literal. But when you can buy a Santoku for $20. or one for $120., I guarantee the $120 will be better, hold it's edge longer etc.I think the worst thing for a knife edge, and I do it all the time, is scraping the chopped food to the corner of the cutting board, ugh! It's a habit I can't seem to break, so I have to sharpen my knives quite often because of that, oh well.I personally like the laminated steel knives. Some have just a few layers, and some have up to 20 layers, and I think all are a better quality than most stainless varieties, plus they're beautiful.If you really want a masterful tomato cutting experience, go with a ceramic Santoku or Kyocera Kyotop Damascus. It's the sharpest edge achieved by humans thus far, but only to be use for certain vegetables IMO. (like not pineapple, butternut squash etc.)You'll pay dearly for it though as they start at $200 and can go up to what ever you want to spend, if you're rich! But would you really WANT a brand new Cadillac if it only cost $10,000? I wouldn't....Sorry, I kind of jacked your thread! I could go on all day about knives (obviously).Join me next week when I talk all about "Sharpening"! LOL!


I knew I liked Scoville! I'm a knife freak too! Not butterfly knives but high quality knives that serve a specific purpose.

#14 Scoville DeVille

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Posted 08 October 2011 - 02:22 PM

I knew I liked Scoville! I'm a knife freak too! Not butterfly knives but high quality knives that serve a specific purpose.


Yeeeah Buddy!

There's just something about nice knives that make me feel all warm and fuzzy inside.




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