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#1 NorthernJeff

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 07:07 AM

Hi THP world,

 

Quick question: Has anyone found it worthwhile & helpful to mix/sprinkle used coffee grinds into your hot pepper plants soil?

We have an espresso machine, and bean grinder here at home on a regular basis, and there's no shortage of used coffee grinds.  I'm wondering if the slightly acidic medium could help the soil with nutrients, and also bring the PH down naturally a little (since the water going in is around 7.6-7.8.

 

Thoughts?  Thanks!



#2 rickster

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 07:47 AM

i add coffee grounds to the compost pile. never tried putting around the plant


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#3 solid7

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 07:54 AM

Second that.  If a coffee ground has any value as a top dressing, it has exponential value when composted.


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#4 SavinaRed

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:36 AM

I do both and add coffee to my compost as well as my topsoil especially with my blueberries.



#5 FiresOfNil

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:43 AM

Used coffee grounds are significantly less acidic - almost neutral - but they do add a decent boost nitrogen uncomposted.
But as a pH amendment it is unlikely that you will see a swing one way or the other. Hope that helps!

Oh and I remembered - grounds can also discourage some soil borne pests.

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#6 dragonsfire

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 11:03 AM

I have added them to the top and a couple days ago I mixed in a half gallon to my next soil mix.



#7 ShowMeDaSauce

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 11:09 AM

I mix coffee grinds with my soil mix. Nutrient wise its not much but it helps the soil drain better in pots. Best of all its free and i have plenty of it by spring time.



#8 Noah Yates

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 11:59 AM

I feed them to my worms, which in turn feed them to my plants.



#9 moruga welder

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 12:41 PM

I feed them to my worms, which in turn feed them to my plants.

+ 1- worms,worms,worms, I get them by the 3 gal. buckets ( coffee grounds that is )  from local restaurants as well as home .      :party:


Edited by moruga welder, 09 February 2017 - 01:23 PM.


#10 U)<now

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 01:19 PM

This video talks about the use of both coffee grounds and Epsom salts in depth with soil testing to back up the findings.

https://youtu.be/DaCVoCnzav8

Edited by U)<now, 09 February 2017 - 01:20 PM.

Next year, I'll grow less plants...  :crazy:


#11 solid7

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 03:28 PM

Oh and I remembered - grounds can also discourage some soil borne pests.

 

In fairness, though - compost does, also. (and probably way better)

Any organic matter added to the soil is great at discouraging nematodes. (which don't tend to be a huge problem in peppers) 


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#12 NinjaR

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 07:40 PM

This video talks about the use of both coffee grounds and Epsom salts in depth with soil testing to back up the findings.

It's not that Epsom salt and coffee grounds can't help; it's just likely they won't.  There are exceptions to this.  If your soil is deficient in magnesium or sulfur, Epsom salt won't immediately fix a deficiency, but it will help with it over time.  Coffee grounds will add a bit of nutrition and organic matter to the beds.

Neither are the wonder fixes they're often touted to be, though.  I compost all coffee grounds...it doesn't hurt to add them directly to a bed, but it's not likely have an immediate or significant effect.

I see Epsom salt promoted as a spritz, added to beds when planting, and as a magic cure-all so often, I was compelled to create this a while back:

11755911_10206123298032886_1935917693290


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#13 Powelly

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 08:11 PM

Can't beat a bit of magnesium sulfate induced complete bowel irrigation from reverse osmosis



#14 U)<now

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 09:12 PM



I see Epsom salt promoted as a spritz, added to beds when planting, and as a magic cure-all so often, I was compelled to create this a while back:

11755911_10206123298032886_1935917693290


:rofl:

Next year, I'll grow less plants...  :crazy:


#15 solid7

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 09:36 PM

It's not that Epsom salt and coffee grounds can't help; it's just likely they won't.  There are exceptions to this.  If your soil is deficient in magnesium or sulfur, Epsom salt won't immediately fix a deficiency, but it will help with it over time.  Coffee grounds will add a bit of nutrition and organic matter to the beds.

Neither are the wonder fixes they're often touted to be, though.  I compost all coffee grounds...it doesn't hurt to add them directly to a bed, but it's not likely have an immediate or significant effect.

I see Epsom salt promoted as a spritz, added to beds when planting, and as a magic cure-all so often, I was compelled to create this a while back:

11755911_10206123298032886_1935917693290


Given the choice between coffee grounds and Epsom Salt, I'd say that coffee grounds do more good than Epsom salts. Most people don't even know why they're applying Epsom. (or even what's in it)

You can never go wrong with adding quality organic matter to compost. And coffee grounds are some of the best compost.

PS - sorry about your kids and the 2nd grade. On the bright side, if they haven't made it out by age 21, they'll automatically graduate.

Edited by solid7, 09 February 2017 - 09:38 PM.

Dave2000 - "Problem is, you happened upon the REAL DEAL."

#16 Tarzan

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 04:01 PM

I have used coffee grounds last year. I mixed a lot of that stuff into the compost and later sprinkled more on top. I've had the best chili season so far. It's true though, that I also used more compost than ever before and we've had excellent weather. :)

 

I throw most on my blueberries and rhododendrons. I am going to use some on my chilies this year as well. And worms love it.


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#17 TNKS

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Posted 26 February 2017 - 11:31 AM

coffee grounds are great for top dressing in ground or buckets(including the filter paper)



#18 Geonerd

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Posted 27 February 2017 - 12:23 AM

A few years back I tried using a LOT of 'raw' coffee grounds as part of my potting soil mix.  

You really don't want to do that to your plants.....  :(

 

A few percent, mixed in or sprinkled on top, is fine.  IMO, 5% or greater is asking for trouble.  Better to save them for your worm farm.

 

Most Starbucks are happy to give you their used coffee.  Stop by at closing time with a big bucket. They'll actually thank you for saving them the job of bagging and tossing the stuff.  Some stores collect and give away bags of the stuff.

 

 


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