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Limited heat mat real estate -- cardboard dividers for cups?


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#1 TheTRPV1Agonist

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 10:08 PM

Hey there, hope the harvests are going well in the northern hemi! 

 

I've been starting seeds and I'm venturing into familiar territory... limited space indoors. I was wondering whether placing a cardboard separator to divide a cup into two is worth doing. I've done a few plants per cup in the past, but when it got to transplanting the roots had become intertwined and it was a bit of work to get them untangled. Of course, there was some inevitable root damage in the process.

 

Is it worth placing a separator in to prevent root systems becoming entangled, or are peppers robust enough to sustain a bit of root damage on transplanting? 

 

I aim to transplant out in 6 weeks, or even longer, so the root system could still be fairly nascent. 

 

Sure, planting less is an option, but the likelihood of that is ... very low. 

 

 



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#2 BlackFatalii

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 11:11 PM

 are peppers robust enough to sustain a bit of root damage on transplanting? 

 

 

 

 

Yes, pepper seedlings are quite resilient. I first try to gently untangle the roots, and that usually works for me. But if they are just too entangled to separate, I will use scissors to cut them apart. As long as each seedling gets its fair share of the root ball, they are almost always fine. So I wouldn't bother with cardboard dividers in the cups.


Edited by BlackFatalii, 10 July 2018 - 11:18 PM.


#3 YAMracer754

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:43 AM

Hey there, hope the harvests are going well in the northern hemi! 
 
I've been starting seeds and I'm venturing into familiar territory... limited space indoors. I was wondering whether placing a cardboard separator to divide a cup into two is worth doing. I've done a few plants per cup in the past, but when it got to transplanting the roots had become intertwined and it was a bit of work to get them untangled. Of course, there was some inevitable root damage in the process.
 
Is it worth placing a separator in to prevent root systems becoming entangled, or are peppers robust enough to sustain a bit of root damage on transplanting? 
 
I aim to transplant out in 6 weeks, or even longer, so the root system could still be fairly nascent. 
 
Sure, planting less is an option, but the likelihood of that is ... very low. 
 
 

Use a business card or something of the sort.. You're on the right track of thinkin versus untangling things and in my experience DEFINITELY slowing/stunting the growth rate! I learned the hard way and by separating you're ahead of the curve!

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Edited by YAMracer754, 11 July 2018 - 12:44 AM.


#4 Edmick

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:57 AM

Maybe use the 72 cell inserts for the 1020 trays? They work great for fitting lots of seedlings into a small space.

#5 Walchit

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 05:52 AM

Don't use paper or cardboard... The roots will grow into it and it will probably be more difficult than if you just had soil in there. 



#6 TheTRPV1Agonist

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 10:31 AM

Maybe use the 72 cell inserts for the 1020 trays? They work great for fitting lots of seedlings into a small space.

 

Obvious alternative that I overlooked... I also forgot I ordered a 7x7 plug trainer by Agralan, it arrived today. Fits 49 seedlings in about 8" x 8". 

 

Don't use paper or cardboard... The roots will grow into it and it will probably be more difficult than if you just had soil in there. 

 

I was thinking that laminated cardboard (such as you'd find with a cereal box) might be okay. But you've got a point there, could make things harder



#7 solid7

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 10:32 AM

Or just skip the heatmat altogether, for where you don't have the room...  They'll sprout. ;)


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#8 TheTRPV1Agonist

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 10:42 AM

Or just skip the heatmat altogether, for where you don't have the room...  They'll sprout. ;)

 

Certainly an option too. But it might be a slow process no? The heating isn't working at the moment, so it's about 15*C/60F indoors



#9 solid7

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 10:56 AM

 

Certainly an option too. But it might be a slow process no? The heating isn't working at the moment, so it's about 15*C/60F indoors

 

Yeah, that's a bit on the cool side. Not gonna work.


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#10 YAMracer754

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Posted 11 July 2018 - 12:30 PM

Don't use paper or cardboard... The roots will grow into it and it will probably be more difficult than if you just had soil in there. 

Yeah ya got a point if he were to let them get overgrown.. Well plastic is good or the easiest way and how I did it is what Ed suggested (72cell trays in 1020s)

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