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fermenting Fermenting a Pepper Mash, First Time

Hello all.  I am new to fermenting peppers but I decided to do a large batch, about three 32 oz mason jars (half full with a pepper mash with salt).  In the beginning, the fermentation was going crazy well, a lot of bubbles, a lot of activity.  So day after day 2 I saw a thin layer of white stuff at the top, coating the dryer section of the mash (as the stuff kept raising during fermentation).  I scooped it out and then mixed the mash and packed it back into the more juicy section. 
Now I'm on about day 6, the fermentation has slowed down a lot (I assume because the most volatile part is simply during the first few days).  The weather has been pretty warm here, in the 70s to 80s during the day, and every day I've found another thin layer of white stuff at the top. I was wondering if anyone could explain if this is yeast or a really bad sign.  After the first day I added a little bit more salt to the mixture. 
 
I do understand that with the constant scooping out the yeast I can introduce new bacteria to the system as well as lose a lot of the final product, however as I'm inexperienced I'm a bit afraid of what might happen if I just let the yeast thrive.
 
P.S.
Picture attached of the first day, though I will try to get a better one when what I'm assuming to be is yeast grows again.  Also if anyone has photos of a pepper mash with mold on it, please share
 

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I do fermentation with only salt and mash and have gotten kahm yeast after a week or more.  One thing I do before bottling, and I have no idea if this helps, but I pour boiling water into the jar for a minute and then back out before immediately pouring in the mash.
 
The ambient temps here are in the 90's ALWAYS.  I like the idea of leaving it out in the kitchen without refrigeration but once the yeast shows up, I kinda give up that idea and move them to the fridge.  
 
One little trick that may be useful is I will take them out of the fridge and leave them out during the day so the fermentation can kick into a higher gear for a while.  Then back into the fridge at night.  
 
I live in Bangkok and finding a bubble airlock locally is a real PITA (esp in a country where it's technically illegal to brew beer) and so far haven't found any. Once I do the yeast issue should be lowered if not illuminated from what I have read in the forums here.
 
mrohner said:
Hello all.  I am new to fermenting peppers but I decided to do a large batch, about three 32 oz mason jars (half full with a pepper mash with salt).  In the beginning, the fermentation was going crazy well, a lot of bubbles, a lot of activity.  So day after day 2 I saw a thin layer of white stuff at the top, coating the dryer section of the mash (as the stuff kept raising during fermentation).  I scooped it out and then mixed the mash and packed it back into the more juicy section. 
Now I'm on about day 6, the fermentation has slowed down a lot (I assume because the most volatile part is simply during the first few days).  The weather has been pretty warm here, in the 70s to 80s during the day, and every day I've found another thin layer of white stuff at the top. I was wondering if anyone could explain if this is yeast or a really bad sign.  After the first day I added a little bit more salt to the mixture. 
 
I do understand that with the constant scooping out the yeast I can introduce new bacteria to the system as well as lose a lot of the final product, however as I'm inexperienced I'm a bit afraid of what might happen if I just let the yeast thrive.
 
P.S.
Picture attached of the first day, though I will try to get a better one when what I'm assuming to be is yeast grows again.  Also if anyone has photos of a pepper mash with mold on it, please share
Same here I keep it cleaned out not stirring in any oxygen and just scooping it and tasting not sourness bottled.it worked my tip is never get lot of oxygen in fermented jar as you scooped yeast and if taste sours well I have lost some bottling as fermentation runs it caused oxygen and rot mold hope this helps you and other other people give their experience also GG .
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mrohner you have too much head space in those jars, which allows too much air into the ferment.  Can't be for sure but it looks like kham yeast is forming on the surface.  If it's all white and somewhat wispy you're likely fine.  If its multicolored or fuzzy then that is mold and you need to pitch the batch.  In 32oz mason jar ferments I run I leave less than 2" of head space to make it easier for the fermenting mash to drive the oxygen out of the airlock.  You said that you had three of the jars, I'd suggest using the same amount of mash in only two jars next time.  
 
Hi
 
I used to have this problem especially when I was trying to ferment cucumbers or make sauerkraut.  I tried a  bunch of different techniques to eliminate.  The absolute best that I have developed uses the same Ball jars, the two piece lids, and a foodsaver canning attachment.  I've attached some photos.
 
The guys over at Foodsaver have an attachment for both small and large size jars.  It fits over the lid, creates a vacuum, and seals all in one step.  If you already have a foodsaver, then you just need the cheap attachment which sells on Amazon.  See an example here.
 
As the ferment goes along in the first day or two the seal will likely be broken which is fine since it will be CO2 anyway.  After a few days I re-seal mine just to be extra careful but there probably isn't any need.  I always re-seal after stirring to ensure no oxygen is in the jar.  Yeast need oxygen to grow and multiply so no oxygen means no yeast.   It has worked perfectly for me.  It also allows for jars which are less full since you are pulling the excess air out which definitely creates problems otherwise.
 
thorntad said:
Hi
 
I used to have this problem especially when I was trying to ferment cucumbers or make sauerkraut.  I tried a  bunch of different techniques to eliminate.  The absolute best that I have developed uses the same Ball jars, the two piece lids, and a foodsaver canning attachment.  I've attached some photos.
 
The guys over at Foodsaver have an attachment for both small and large size jars.  It fits over the lid, creates a vacuum, and seals all in one step.  If you already have a foodsaver, then you just need the cheap attachment which sells on Amazon.  See an example here.
 
As the ferment goes along in the first day or two the seal will likely be broken which is fine since it will be CO2 anyway.  After a few days I re-seal mine just to be extra careful but there probably isn't any need.  I always re-seal after stirring to ensure no oxygen is in the jar.  Yeast need oxygen to grow and multiply so no oxygen means no yeast.   It has worked perfectly for me.  It also allows for jars which are less full since you are pulling the excess air out which definitely creates problems otherwise.
Aww no photos. ☹️
 
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