capsaicin First Trinidad Scorpion and a Change in Direction

Pimental said:
I guess most of that is common to all people trying really hot peppers for the first time, so I'm not complaining - it was a good experience. But I can't really say I liked it. And I don't have a particular desire to continue to consume things that hot. I thought I would, but after that, the appeal for "extreme heat" is kinda gone in me. I'll grow the scorpion plant I've got and maybe make some sauce from it, but I threw out the seeds I'd saved, and I think I'm gonna stick to mostly less-hot varieties from now on.

I was kinda wondering if anyone had a similar experience with this?

Best,
Nathan
Nothing wrong with just liking habanero (or whatever) as a max heat if that’s what works for you. Eat what you like. If you develop a tolerance and want more, delve back in to super hots. And I’d recommend you save those or upcoming seeds just for the hell of it. I’ve germinated nine year old ones in a last ditch effort before.

This year I made a pure 7 pod Jonah fermented sauce and could not stop eating it. Sometimes if you eat enough super hots it gets you both ways in the bathroom if you know what I’m sayin. I’m just gonna stop posting there.
 
Sorry to relive this thread, but I just read it and I found your story with the first superhot to be very funny.
Something similar happened to me, with a Moruga Scorpion, but I ate a bite, as initially it did not bite much and the taste was very good I thought "maybe it is a hybrid and it doesn't have too heat, it is very tasty" and I ate the rest .. I think everyone can imagine the story below: shortness of breath, hiccups, tears and many insults to myself.

I also got angry and threw seeds. I thought that was not for me.

Today I still plant superhots, but only one or two varieties per season. The rest are more manageable peppers, the limit I have put in the habanero heat. I like to eat them fresh, sliced on the food; so the less spicy are better for me.

With the superhots I make oil infusions and some fermented sauce. Also, sometimes, I dare to chop a little in my food, even if later my stomach tells me that it wasn't good.

It's okay that you want to change course and plant softer strains, I do too. But I am sure that now, two years later, you have planted superhots again.

Tell us, what are you grow now?
 
Sorry to relive this thread, but I just read it and I found your story with the first superhot to be very funny.
Something similar happened to me, with a Moruga Scorpion, but I ate a bite, as initially it did not bite much and the taste was very good I thought "maybe it is a hybrid and it doesn't have too heat, it is very tasty" and I ate the rest .. I think everyone can imagine the story below: shortness of breath, hiccups, tears and many insults to myself.

I also got angry and threw seeds. I thought that was not for me.

Today I still plant superhots, but only one or two varieties per season. The rest are more manageable peppers, the limit I have put in the habanero heat. I like to eat them fresh, sliced on the food; so the less spicy are better for me.

With the superhots I make oil infusions and some fermented sauce. Also, sometimes, I dare to chop a little in my food, even if later my stomach tells me that it wasn't good.

It's okay that you want to change course and plant softer strains, I do too. But I am sure that now, two years later, you have planted superhots again.

Tell us, what are you grow now?

Nice to hear a similar story, and no problem about reviving an old thread.

I did grow some peppers the year after the Scorpion incident, and while I attempted to grow some pretty hot ones, it was kind-of a half-hearted effort because I was in the process of moving, and most of them didn't make it through to fruiting (due to negligence).

In 2020 the two big successes were Cayenne plants and Aji Pineapples. Due to the others failing, and living in an apartment, I gave up on peppers in 2021. However, I did pick up some interesting non-Chinense pepper cultivars, and have 12 types set up for germination now - actually, in part because I saw your message and was encouraged to try again this year (this time with more effort).

I have noticed how quickly tolerance goes down when one doesn't readily have a supply of peppers. This past year I didn't eat/cook as much spicy food, and as a result, just yesterday at an OSU party I found myself hiccuping at some habanero cheese...tsk.

I have both Chinense and non-Chinense peppers germinating rn, but the choice to focus on the latter was that they seemed to be easier/heartier plants, and better in pots, than the Chinense varieties. However, this season I have someone I can 'farm out' all the sprouts I don't decide to try to grow at my apartment, so hopefully some of the Chinense varieties will get some TLC from some homeschooling friends nearby. We shall see. The current list is:

Dark Thai (Matt's Peppers)
Hot Orange Thai (WHP)
Hangjiao #3 Solar Flare (WHP)
Thunder Mountain Longhorn (WHP)
Hot Cayenne, Sweet Cayenne (WHP)
Joy's Ghost Cayenne Off Pheno (WHP)
Aji Mango x JPGS
Tepin x Aji Lemon
Dwarf Chiltepin (Matt's Peppers)
CGN 24360
BB7 x Tobasco
 
that aji mango x jpgs and the bb7 x Tabasco sound intriguing , plus anything tepin is usually tasty to me.

good luck on the grow. I think I need to step up to growing from seed this year. my sources for interesting plants have dried up the past couple seasons with the pandemic.

my wife has decided to put Xmas lights on my 2 yr old Trinidad this year.

PXL_20211129_031901722.jpg



it looks cooler in night sight .

PXL_20211129_043141445.NIGHT.jpg
 
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that aji mango x jpgs and the bb7 x Tabasco sound intriguing , plus anything tepin is usually tasty to me.

good luck on the grow. I think I need to step up to growing from seed this year. my sources for interesting plants have dried up the past couple seasons with the pandemic.

my wife has decided to put Xmas lights on my 2 yr old Trinidad this year.


it looks cooler in night sight .

Ashen, I like the Christmas-tree-esque pepper plant. Regarding interesting plants, I recommend White Hot Peppers; they're affordable and much nicer than most of the hot pepper seed sellers I've interacted with. And I've had the most success with his seeds. Albeit most are Chinense peppers. If the crosses turn out well this year, and you'd like some, I can send some peppers/seeds your way.
 
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