capsaicin First Trinidad Scorpion and a Change in Direction

Im not sure if this woul be the best place to post this, and I apologize if it isn't.

Today I tried a "superhot" for the first time. The hottest thing I'd had prior to today was habaneros - now, I'm pretty used to eating about one habanero per taco, but eating them plain still shakes me up a bit. I love the flavor, though, and the pain is just part of that. Today, however, I tried the first pepper to finish ripening on my Trinidad Scorpion plant (currently shown in my avatar). I cut it in half, picked out the seeds (to save), and cut the half in half again - then "ate up". It took a bit for the heat to rise - at first I knew it was hot but was enjoying the other flavors. Then I felt myself tearing up - which was funny because it still didn't seem that bad. But after a minute, my whole mouth was in pain, and I didn't really taste anything. I started hiccuping - really, really hard. Habaneros give me a case of the hiccups, but they're normal hiccups. These were violent and probably the worst part of the experience.

I guess most of that is common to all people trying really hot peppers for the first time, so I'm not complaining - it was a good experience. But I can't really say I liked it. And I don't have a particular desire to continue to consume things that hot. I thought I would, but after that, the appeal for "extreme heat" is kinda gone in me. I'll grow the scorpion plant I've got and maybe make some sauce from it, but I threw out the seeds I'd saved, and I think I'm gonna stick to mostly less-hot varieties from now on.

I was kinda wondering if anyone had a similar experience with this?

Best,
Nathan
 
I love REALLY hot food but as someone that has consumed the hottest of the hot I can say, super hots are a novelty. The amount it would take to impart an actual FLAVOR into a dish is quickly overtaken by searing pain that is not comfortable for even the most extreme chile head. Anyone that says they ENJOY fresh super hots by themselves is lying to you. It's an ego thing. BUT, I have enjoyed plenty of sauces made with super hots. They just need to be used in limited quantities to make sure the sauce is actually edible. My palate is at a point right now that my wife's mouth will be on fire and I feel nothing but nonetheless, superhots are overrated.
 
I'm looking into options to grow next year. I am in the same boat, I am moreso looking for flavor than pure fire. I normally cook with any pepper and want to feel the heat. Do any of you have recommendations on a good pepper that has a punch but also has flavor? 
I'm currently growing Biker Billy's because I heard they're hot with flavor. But i have no pods yet so haven't tried. 
 
Eat a couple of chocolate bhutlahs. Your brain will have a more intense frame of reference so you won't enter panic mode so easily and you can slow down and enjoy flavors.

Also I can definitely say that enjoying a fresh superhot is not always an ego thing. I eat them and couldn't imagine doing something I dislike so I can brag to people who don't actually care.
 
Ruid said:
Eat a couple of chocolate bhutlahs. Your brain will have a more intense frame of reference so you won't enter panic mode so easily and you can slow down and enjoy flavors.

Also I can definitely say that enjoying a fresh superhot is not always an ego thing. I eat them and couldn't imagine doing something I dislike so I can brag to people who don't actually care.
 
definitely don't care about ego. I did look into the choco ones on some sites a few days ago. So i'm definitely going to try those out next year. 
 
Are they still plenty hot? I definitely enjoy heat but I'm unsure how to quantify it. I guess I could use the Scoville, but as you know sometimes a dud pepper can affect this. 
 
Do you know approx where the choco falls in Scoville units? 
 
*edit: after a quick google, there are conflicting views. Apparently the choco bhut hasn't been verified on the Scoville scale? 
 
Flavor is always the main concern but chocolates are a divide for a lot of us. People seem to love 'em or hate 'em.

The science seems to say chocolates are either the same heat as their red counterparts or only slightly hotter, but many (myself included) think they seem hotter. If it SEEMS that way, the reality of the situation hardly matters.

Basically eat what you can find and find your preferences.
 
Lemon drops have good manageable heat as well as versatility. They pair better citrus wise in my opinion.

CGN 21500 is excellent taste wise. Not much heat but thick crunchy walls.

Love a good Bhut. Definitely hot enough while not being extreme overkill if used properly. If not used properly will light you up.

Don't overlook the humble jalapeno and poblano. Many do.

Thai/Birds eye and tabascos are good as well. Plenty hot enough while being compatible with heat tolerance of the masses.

Let's not leave out the scotch bonnets and habaneros. I prefer scotch's myself. But a good datil or fatalii will do in a pinch though.

Plenty of peppers that aren't supers that are excellent. I myself don't eat raw supers whole. In fact I usually only use 3 supers to heat a 32oz jar of sauce.

I never sacrifice flavor for heat.

Good luck!
 
I'll always promote the Bahamian Goat pepper whenever I get the chance. It's hot but not a super and it's delicious both in and out of dishes.

I say that you should make yourself endure the hottest of the hot at least a few times so weaker stuff seems like nothing when it used to be tough.

Eat a few of those Morugas or some reapers and you'll laugh about how hot habaneros used to seem and will be able to enjoy them garden fresh.
 
     Thanks for all the suggestions! I'll definitely look into trying some of them out. I'm definitely looking into trying scotch bonnets and maybe a datil or fatalii. The lemon drops look super cool, and I'll keep the goat pepper in mind too.
     I ended up making a hot sauce out of an earlier crop of peppers and some from the store - it was not very hot, but used 10 different types of peppers and was super flavorful. I'm planning on making a second, much hotter version once my scorpion and habanero plants have produced more. I'm over the initial shock of the scorpion, but still a little cautious. Back to enjoying all things spicy.
 
I grow the superhots, but I don't eat many of them. I mostrly dry mine and grind them into powder. That way you can effectively dose out the heat.  :fireball:
 
When i'm eating peppers, I tend to like the baccatums which have a sweet, fruity flavor and sometimes a good punch of heat, or rocotos (pubsecens) which also have a great taste and respectiable heat.
 
Several of the baccatums are really excellent fresh and wont melt your face. Only pepper more fruity ive tried might be a rocoto. Rocotos can be super juicy just like a piece of fruit. Depending on climate they can be a challenge to get ripe peppers. Ajis will grow like mad all over as long as its not too cold. Production can be crazy high for Lemon Drops and Sugar Rush Peach just to name a couple. Brazilian Starfish produce good too. They are even milder and more fruity. Almost cherry like in flavor.
 
midwestchilehead said:
I grow the superhots, but I don't eat many of them. I mostrly dry mine and grind them into powder. That way you can effectively dose out the heat.  :fireball:
 
When i'm eating peppers, I tend to like the baccatums which have a sweet, fruity flavor and sometimes a good punch of heat, or rocotos (pubsecens) which also have a great taste and respectiable heat.
Exactly.  Most of my supers are for powder.  I do sauce a few.  Most Habs and Bonnets get sauced.  For fresh eating, annuums (Jalas, Anaheim variants, Poblanos, Serranos, Fresnos, Cubanelles, Stuffing Bonnets, Italian Roasters) and bacccatums.    
 
sjunbboi said:
I'm looking into options to grow next year. I am in the same boat, I am moreso looking for flavor than pure fire. I normally cook with any pepper and want to feel the heat. Do any of you have recommendations on a good pepper that has a punch but also has flavor? 
I'm currently growing Biker Billy's because I heard they're hot with flavor. But i have no pods yet so haven't tried. 
 
You only can handle a small amount fresh, unless you are insane (we have a few of those on this forum ;-)
And it's deceiving! When you open a Ghost, that fruit makes you want to just "dive in."
And, in sauce, salsa, flakes and dust, it is really a good mixer. A small amount can go a long way.
I took about 4 cans of diced Hunts tomatoes; some garlic powder, minced onion,
1/2 teaspoon white distilled vinegar, and couple pinches of salt
Half of a large can of tomato paste (or you can use one full can of those tiny/slim cans)
I mixed it with about one pod of semi-dried ghost, cut into very tiny slivers. It made 2 of the Ball/Mason jars of salsa.
Unfortunately (or fortunately), I will have to pour one jar into a baggie and freeze it; won't have time to eat both.
I just hand-stirred it and got the ghost flakes and other ingredients well-mixed.
It's a bit hotter than I intended; but it's a "sneaky" hot. Eat some with tortilla chips.
Then... wait... and AH! Okay... there's that sneaky burn! But it's at a nice level that I love, but the wife would hate.
Also made some ghost flakes with my "homemade" dehydrator - vs. turning on the oven while it's 100 degrees in Tennessee,
I took ceramic plate, and old plastic top from Pot Pie you buy at Publix, Kroger or Wal-Mart.
Cut 4 holes evenly-spaced around the plastic lid.
Put the cut/de-seeded ghost slices on the plate, cover with the plastic vented lid
Weight it down with a pyrex bowl, so the plastic lid doesn't blow off - and pyrex glass lets the sun through.
Put in direct sun; Wait 5+ hours. Mine sat in about 5 hours direct sun; then almost two hours still on the front porch,
but sun was gone past that area. Took them inside, and all of it crumbles very nicely, except a very small amount.
I would say 99% dried. If I moved the remainder behind the house for 1+ hours more direct sun, the rest would be dry.
It was about 10
HomeMade Dehydrator.jpg
Scorpion Ghost and more Seeds and flakes 2019.jpg
Ghost Salsa and Peppadew 2019.jpg
pods, and I seem to have gotten maybe 1/4th ounce of flakes.
 
HotSpit, thanks for the info on drying, that's a really simple technique, and I'll definitely try it next season (unless my friend lets me borrow his dehydrator).

I'm definitely looking forward to the new suggested peppers for next season. High on the list are bonnets and ajis, and I might get a habanada just for fun. I made a mash (well, I blended up my peppers with 1/3c apple cider vinegar and salt, to fill a small mason jar) of scorpions and habs and super chilis and cayennes (mostly habs though), and I've been mixing it with salsas and soups to get my tolerance up a little. Less hiccuping in general now, though I've also just been hiccuping at random stuff now, like jalapeños, which didn't used to happen.
 
Trinidad scorpion.
 
Hottest chile I ever ate.
 
I lived through the burn of eating it.
 
The next day.
 
My bunghollio.
 
Felt like someone sewed in a YKK zipper.
 
And then started ripping it back and forth.
 
That was a few years ago.
 
I have two plants on my mothers back porch.
 
I'm hoping to do a mango t scorp hot sauce.
 
Because.
 
I'm crazy.
 
That way.
 
Oh good I thought I was the only one that experienced the "painful goodbye". I had to throw out my mild to hot scale when dealing with scorpions. I now have a new scale which is mild to hot and hot plus which includes dancing with Kenny Loggins in the Danger Zone. Why? Because the gastric distress the morning after keeps you hopping until it vamooses out! 
 
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