Next Season

Hello all, been a while since I have posted.  I have been toggling around the last few years on what I grow to try different varieties.  I grew out all my Yellow Scotch Bonnet seeds I obtained from Juanitos's website that he obtained from CARDI, so didn't grow any of those last year, but need to find more seeds.  I have grown Shushito's for my parents who love them and looking for another type of pepper to grow next year, possibly 2 different types.  I really enjoy the scotch bonnnets for making Jerk Chicken and Ribs but they are way too hot for me to eat and enjoy raw or in normal foods.  
 
Any suggestions for peppers around mild or average jalapeno heat levels?  I enjoy the quick flare up and short burn time of the Scotch Bonnets in Jerk marinades.  Would love to find some lower heat things that are a similar burn profile with nice fruity flavor.  Here are a few peppers I am thinking of for next years growing.  I am not into playing Russian Roulette with my taste buds so tend to shy away from peppers that produce random heat levels with any given pepper that comes off the plant.  Any input on these varieties or other suggestions would be great, I will put comments after them for what I have been told about them.  =)
 
~Aji Golden (jalapeno hot and kind of fruity?)
~Pimenta Biquinho (friend says these have no heat just great flavor?)
~Aji Mango (unsure of heat level but also sort of fruity?)
~Lemon Drop (unsure of heat level and taste)
~Brazilian Starfish (unsure of heat level and heard very fruity taste?)
~Manzano (unsure of heat level, heard very fruity and difficult to grow, low producers?)
 
spicefreak said:
Aji Limon/Lemondrop tastes very citrusy and slightly like lemons but its heat is around a Bird's Eye or just a little under Habanero.
 
Ty Spicefreak, Aji Lemon is probably too hot for me then so I will check that off the list.
 
Ghaleon said:
Brazilian Starfish has a cherry-like flavor and is low heat.
 
Any indication of the heat level in possible Scoville units?  Some think something is low heat and would set me on fire =)
 

bob65

Extreme Member
twiasp said:
 
Any indication of the heat level in possible Scoville units?  Some think something is low heat and would set me on fire =)
 
 
Brazillian Starfish - 10 000 to 30 000 shu.
 
Google is your friend
 
My Brazilian Starfish are about mid jalapeno hot and even milder if you avoid the seeds/placenta. My Lemon Drops were around top of Serrano heat levels and much milder away from the seeds. Not anywhere near hab hot. Aji LIMO is around habanero hot and Aji Cito were sorta in between. Some were quite a bit hotter than lemon drops but not as hot as a orange hab.
 
For snacking and eating fresh the Starfish is excellent but its probably a bit mild for a hot sauce. Mine are incredibly sweet. The placenta area is hotter than a average jalapeno but not by a great deal.
 
None of them will taste like a bonnet though or even a hab. You choices are very limited if you want a jalapeno level chinense. They are mostly either heatless or a little hotter than a Serrano.
 
In my experience Stavros and Vezena Piperka are great varieties. Very sweet and mild heat, even my wife likes to snack on them! :)
 
There are several really good tasting Anaheims such as Big Jim and Sandia Select. Most will be in the jalapeno range or slightly less. A few might push the upper end. There are milder kinds of Anaheims too with almost no heat at all.
 
Antep Aci Dolma is a spicy bell from Turkey. Mine are still green but the one i tasted had a little zip to it. Very little for the most part but more in the placenta. Pod walls are fairly thin and should be ok for powder too....There are many peppers from the Syria/Turkey area with mild heat and great flavor. Lots of bells for stuffing with very faint heat.
 
A great nearly heatless jalapeno is the Farmers Market jalapeno. Flavor is outstanding. Only had one sofar lightly grilled with a steak.
 
ShowMeDaSauce said:
There are several really good tasting Anaheims such as Big Jim and Sandia Select. Most will be in the jalapeno range or slightly less. A few might push the upper end. There are milder kinds of Anaheims too with almost no heat at all.
 
I have thought about Anaheims also, how is their productivity?  Any particular one to suggest that is mild jalapeno heat of the 2 you suggested or other?
 
I grew Frontera Sweets last year... They were low heat but definitely not entirely heatless... The flavor was more like a Yella Bonnet than anything else I've had, aside from genuine Bonnets.... But I can't explain why, it just wasn't as good, overall... Not due to the heat. I feel like the flesh is a bit tough? I dunno. I just remember CHEWING a lot for it being so small and thinking "this tastes really nice, but it's kinda annoying."

I also grew Ecuador Sweets, NuMex Suave in both Yeller and Red, NuMex Trick or Treat, and I am growing Habanadas this year. Suaves are low heat; Trick or Treat is basically zero heat. Nadas are s'posed to be zeroish, too. Of those NuMex, the Trick or Treat are tastiest and pretty juicy. Looking forward to trying the Habanadas.

Best low heat chinense I've had is Aji Jobito. I wanted to grow them this year, but didn't get seeds in time. For 2019, I might grow them, or I might just try to get thru my backlog of NuMex Suaves and Trick or Treat seeds first. These low heat chinense types will likely always have a place in my garden, but they're a very low priority for me.
 
MarcV said:
In my experience Stavros and Vezena Piperka are great varieties. Very sweet and mild heat, even my wife likes to snack on them! :)
 
I have thought about pepperoncini peppers also before for pickling, never eaten any fresh.  Stavros are a nice type of pepperoncini it appears.  May give those a try also, earmarked for my next season list, ty.
 
Bicycle808 said:
I grew Frontera Sweets last year... They were low heat but definitely not entirely heatless... The flavor was more like a Yella Bonnet than anything else I've had, aside from genuine Bonnets.... But I can't explain why, it just wasn't as good, overall... Not due to the heat. I feel like the flesh is a bit tough? I dunno. I just remember CHEWING a lot for it being so small and thinking "this tastes really nice, but it's kinda annoying."

I also grew Ecuador Sweets, NuMex Suave in both Yeller and Red, NuMex Trick or Treat, and I am growing Habanadas this year. Suaves are low heat; Trick or Treat is basically zero heat. Nadas are s'posed to be zeroish, too. Of those NuMex, the Trick or Treat are tastiest and pretty juicy. Looking forward to trying the Habanadas.

Best low heat chinense I've had is Aji Jobito. I wanted to grow them this year, but didn't get seeds in time. For 2019, I might grow them, or I might just try to get thru my backlog of NuMex Suaves and Trick or Treat seeds first. These low heat chinense types will likely always have a place in my garden, but they're a very low priority for me.
 Ty for your reply, I looked into several of these googling around.  The Aji Jobito sounds very interesting, finding great seed stock however may prove difficult.  I like how they are thick walled also, prefer thicker walled peppers for snacking on.
 
twiasp said:
 Ty for your reply, I looked into several of these googling around.  The Aji Jobito sounds very interesting, finding great seed stock however may prove deifficult.  I like how they are thick walled also, prefer thicker walled peppers for snacking on.
The Jobitos are the shit. Just an all-around good example of their type. If you can't find seeds, though, there are a lot of decent alternatives. . .
 
twiasp said:
 Ty for your reply, I looked into several of these googling around.  The Aji Jobito sounds very interesting, finding great seed stock however may prove difficult.  I like how they are thick walled also, prefer thicker walled peppers for snacking on.
Semillas.de has them
 
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