Public Debut - Warrant Man Pepper Co

WarrantMan said:
Walchit,
As I stated, I am a Constitutionalist with Libertarian leanings.  
Can't really go wrong there! If the people making the laws had the same views we would all be in better shape
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Walchit,
 
Thanks bud! I will offer a brief view into my domicile. I am a collector of books and could rival some libraries with my personal collection. Pictured here is one of my most prized ones, a book by Eric Arthur Blair aka George Orwell. First Edition, First American printing, pristine condition. I bid you read it if you have not. The dude was a visionary and I will not comment further. I will only say that I am a fan....
 

 

 
I appreciate your comments more than I can express. 
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
EdMick,
 
I appreciate your time and honesty. I made that particular sauce more for mass appeal than for extreme Chiliheads. It was a big all around hit on my debut. But oddly enough, my clear sauce seemed to be a big hit with the visiting "Yankees" and folks from the UK. I deeply regret not having paid more precise attention. A rookie mistake.
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Regarding anyone who tries or would like to try the Clearly Guilty sauce, know that all my current batches are "fresh." It is good enough, but it does improve with age. Over time, the pepper inside the bottle will fade slightly and the vinegar will see a slight tint. It is then, that the sauce is in its "prime."  If you like it upon first taste, you will "love" it later.....
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
I know that there exists online, a great many skilled sleuths and fact checkers. I offer the following as documented testament to who I am, what I am, and especially my love for hot sauce.
Below, is part of a story that appeared on Tuesday August 5th, 2003 in the The Providence Journal. The morning that article appeared, I had two cases of hot sauce waiting at my hotel door, from a Louisiana cop vying for a position on the National board of the Fraternal Order of Police.
 

 

 

 

 
 
 

MikeUSMC

Extreme Member
"He swore that a guy in the hotel lobby was talking about playing 'cods'..."

"I thought cods were fish (?)"

:rofl:
 
I used to work for a shady telemarketing company, we would call and raise omney for the fop's and sometimes firefighters. We kept 85 percent of the money though, and always hoped nobody asked how much the police got!
 

Edmick

Staff Member
Moderator
Extreme Member
Walchit said:
I used to work for a shady telemarketing company, we would call and raise omney for the fop's and sometimes firefighters. We kept 85 percent of the money though, and always hoped nobody asked how much the police got!
100% of cough cough 15% cough cough.
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Walchit,
 
Good point sir and I will address that as best I can (lest "my mouth overload my a*s.) Many organizations, benevolent or otherwise, use or have used telemarketing as a means to raise funds. It is usually done (from my experience) on an localized level for local branches of the entities. It is a practice that I think has seen it's day and is fading away. I myself do not like telemarketer calls. In as far as the funds distribution, I would wager that the case you cite is typical regardless of the entity. I oft heard the phrase that "15% of something is better than 100% of nothing" used to justify the practice.
 
Again, I will prompt the internet sleuths to check my LinkedIn page and you will find what I list as my single greatest professional feat, the creation of a fund for officers injured in the line of duty. It is not done by phone solicitations, was specifically crafted so that every penny was accountable and only used for the purpose intended. I am no longer an FOP board member, but 15 yrs. later it is still going well. When I am laid to rest, above all else, I hope that this would be my legacy.
 
Thanks again for raising the point. When I joined this forum, I had no idea how much fun it would be, how many great folks I would meet /corresponded with or how much diverse knowledge would be offered that I could learn from. Likewise, I hope that my participation will offer something of a benefit as well, albeit from a narrowly focused perspective.
 
"What I do have is a very particular set of skills.... I will look for you. I will find you - and I will serve your a*s some really good hot sauce!"
 
- Reggie
 
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Upon re-read of the previous post, it seems I violated the first rule of writing. That is, to submit "first draft." My apologies for grammatical errors that I am sure will be glaringly obvious. I hope I succeed in point anyway.
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
In the most unbelievable of circumstances, today found me at a recently opened grocery store called Lowes. While shopping, having the current conversation on my mind, something caught my eye... Coincidence, happenstance or cosmic alignment, I found this and treated myself to a self sponsored Christmas present. Not too shabby I might add! From the man-cave... Hats off to the Rhode Islanders......
 

 
 
 
 

Edmick

Staff Member
Moderator
Extreme Member
WarrantMan said:
Special thanks to THP member (you know who you are) for finding this, I didn't realize it was still out there for view! 
 
https://www.postandcourier.com/news/over-served-deputy-some-call-grim-reaper-might-hold-record/article_42333fd3-1f89-5462-bc04-cc8e787959ec.html
So how many warrants have you served since that story was written? True story, I spent a night in jail for a warrant 5 years ago. I had a DUI 10 years ago and out of the $1,700 and change in fines that I paid off, $12 of it fell through the cracks. I was pulled over and told I had a warrant and I was being arrested. Spent a night in jail over $12... Yup, it's funny now but I was pissed when the judge literally laughed about it and dismissed it.
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Edmick,
 
I really don't know. The last "official" count was done when I left the Sheriff's office in 2012. At that time it was 16,464.  I've worked since then for a municipal police agency (still serving warrants) but also assigned to do "bond hearings" or "arraignments" as they are known in other states. I also handle some out of state extraditions and transport suspects wanted by us from other jurisdictions (in state) that have been captured. So my actual "hunting time" is far less than it used to be. I guess it's time to update the stats.
 
Sorry to hear of your experience. Believe me, you're not alone... Oh the justice system!
 

Edmick

Staff Member
Moderator
Extreme Member
WarrantMan said:
Edmick,
 
I really don't know. The last "official" count was done when I left the Sheriff's office in 2012. At that time it was 16,464.  I've worked since then for a municipal police agency (still serving warrants) but also assigned to do "bond hearings" or "arraignments" as they are known in other states. I also handle some out of state extraditions and transport suspects wanted by us from other jurisdictions that have been captured. I guess it's time to update the stats.
 
Sorry to hear of your experience. Believe me, you're not alone... Oh the justice system!
I laugh about it now knowing it cost the system a lot more than $12 to process me and house me for a night. I still had to sleep on a concrete floor for a night over a $12 administrative fee that got lost in the jungle. Besides my DUI and a couple minor infractions, I've alway been law abiding and there I was using a sack lunch as a pillow on a concrete jail cell. Haha
 

WarrantMan

Extreme Member
Edmick,
 
When I first became a "player" in this game, I was amazed at the cost vs reward ratio. I often traveled many miles (at considerable expense) to bring back and lodge suspects in the jail who had fines that were smaller than the expenditures for enforcement. Didn't make a great deal of sense to me. But, in time, I discovered that monetary gain for enforcement was unconstitutional even for consideration. Most folks have heard about "quotas" and such. An old practice where cops were assigned traffic enforcement duties driven by the aim to produce revenue for the particular town or city etc.. A bad practice on all levels. Many court cases/lawsuits later, it evolved to the point where all cases must be treated similar without regard to potential income from fines.
 
So, a dude held in violation for $12 is the same as a dude held for a $1,000 violation. The only variance comes into play when the suspect is in another state. There, the parameters of enforcement (extradition limitations) are set (in my state) by the Solicitor's office or in other states by the "District Attorney." They determine (not by costs) but by case particulars, how far in distance they will go to extradite someone from another state. Usually the variables are severity of the crime, the age of the case, and likelihood of successful prosecution. In all states, the crimes by which someone can be extradited to another state, must be those whose sentence (if convicted) would carry at minimum, one year or more of sentence. 
 
If you had slept with the same pillow in my jail, it would have contained a sandwich of two slices of bread with peanut butter, a fruit drink and an (apple,orange)  or a sandwich of two slices of bread with bologna slice, fruit drink and an (apple,orange.)  :neutral:
 
in edit: with the "bag lunch" meal as with all jailhouse meals, no salt, no pepper and of course, no "hot sauce." 
 
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