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food-safety roasting onions and garlic without oil

Searched the forum and didn't find any specific answer to this multi-part question.

1. Do any of you add roasted onions/garlic to your sauces?

2. If yes, do you use oil?

3. If you do, but do not use oil, what technique do you use?

4. Does a little oil really matter in a hotsauce that is meant for commercial production? Canola is shelf-stable at room temperature and takes absolute ages to go rancid after opening. Is the only barrier to using oil really whether or not a sauce is shelf-stable un-refrigerated?

I'd really like to get that deep, rich flavor of caramelized and/or on-the-edge-of-burning flavor that you can get from onions (and other possible additions), but I've only ever done that with a coating of oil before cooking.
 
Solution
Is that to say that my recipe in Arizona would possibly not be allowed in, say, New Hampshire? It literally comes down to a state-by-state ruling on safety processes within a specific recipe?
Depends on who you use for process review. Most universities that have a food science department will have a process authority. I use Univ of Nebraska Lincoln for recipe reviews, etc.

An approved recipe and licensed product...and if there is oil in the product, it will need FDA registration and BPCS certification...will be good in all states.

Most of this information and more detailed information in here
Fair fair.

The question was rhetorical anyways.

If botulism is the concern, then I'm not worried. lower than 4.6 pH inhibits botulism spores from doing anything and heating to 85C/185F for at least 10 minutes deactivates botulism toxin.
 

salsalady

Business Member
Since it is for home use, go ahead as you wish, just please be careful. University extension services have websites and recipes. Maybe you can find a recipe there that is close to what you are going for.
SL
 
In my opinion, nothing can beat onions prepared caveman style.
Throw them straight in hot burning charcoal, leave all the skin on and let them char to a crisp.
After a few minutes they start blowing steam and after 10 minutes caramalized sugars start oozing out of them.
When the oozing stops take them out and let cool. Peel of the charred layers and what remains is simply one of the best tasting onion preperations you can get!
Works with fresh garlic as well! No dried garlic, that will burn and get nasty.
 

salsalady

Business Member
Maybe use a dry cast iron skill? Thick-ish sliced onions, browned to desired golden-ness
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
These circular discussions... oil, no oil, pro, hobby lol...
 

salsalady

Business Member
Where is the running-around-in-circles emoji????
 

salsalady

Business Member
That is up to a Process Authority to review your recipe.

If the ratio of oil in the sauce is relatively small, it could be approved for Hot Fill/Hold processing. My bbq sauce contains butter and is HFH approved. I had to get BPCS certified to be able to make it.
 
Is that to say that my recipe in Arizona would possibly not be allowed in, say, New Hampshire? It literally comes down to a state-by-state ruling on safety processes within a specific recipe?
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
It's really not about the science it's about the regulation as related to science. Each state will vary.
 

salsalady

Business Member
Is that to say that my recipe in Arizona would possibly not be allowed in, say, New Hampshire? It literally comes down to a state-by-state ruling on safety processes within a specific recipe?
Depends on who you use for process review. Most universities that have a food science department will have a process authority. I use Univ of Nebraska Lincoln for recipe reviews, etc.

An approved recipe and licensed product...and if there is oil in the product, it will need FDA registration and BPCS certification...will be good in all states.

Most of this information and more detailed information in here
 
Solution
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