labels Sam & Oliver's Molten Gold BBQ sauce - new label critique

Bavarian Gold prototype 5-5.PNG

 
Here's some quick breakdown on how this label is similar but differs from the previous 2 product labels I have:
 
All labels will be on white rounded corner rectangles with glossy overlaminate and waterproof.
 
The label will be 3.25" tall by 9" wide.  Bavarian Gold will be printed with a 2rd color plate, unlike Cinder and Stoke, which used a single color and black.  This raises the cost of the label production slightly, since a 3rd plate must be created before the run is made.
 
The bottle chosen is a stout bottle that's 7" tall just like the 5oz Woozy bottle, but fatter, with a short neck by comparison.  I chose this, rather than the standard decanter style because it was unique, and on the shelf, the products are the same height, which helps in storage and creating a standardized height and look to the products if they are displayed in proximity, or on my booth display.
 
Bavarian Gold will feature the same heat index, at the same height and location as Cinder and Stoke, because it contains a re-formulated Cinder as an actual ingredient. (vinegar type was changed from distilled to match the recipe's predominant Cinder Vinegar base).
 
The challenge for this label is the inclusion of a 4th panel due to the width of the label.  Because the 5oz woozy labels are 5.5", this leaves an additional 3.5".  The 'front' was widened to 4" to not create such a large white 'frame' when viewed on a shelf from the front.  This leads to significantly more black on the front panel, which was adjusted to keep the same 'stripe logo' design for a consistent brand.
 
This product includes Coconut oil and Tamari sauce, which contains soybeans.  Both have to (by law) be printed below the ingredients list, which chews up an entire 2 line feeds of real estate.  The ingredient list, while relatively basic, have lots of sub-components, which prevented me from using the same Nutrition Panel as previous labels.
 
Left panel = Romance Panel
Center Panel = Brand/Logo/Graphics
Right Panel = Nutrition Panel/Ingredients/Allergens
Back Panel = Recipe
 
Things I'm still on the fence about:
Recipe suggesting pairing product with an alcoholic beverage (IPA) - this could potentially be on a shelf at a public grocery store.
Trying to find out if it's legal to declare the allergens as "Contains Coconut and Soybeans" rather than simply "Nuts, Soy"
 
/falls off soapbox
 
Thoughts?
 
Edit: stout bottle picture
5ef32c31c19372d4735d5a77f81bdbdd.jpg
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
You need to mention somewhere it has a kick to it... otherwise it just looks like BBQ sauce, but it has habs... even if it's not hot and just a tingle, need to mention something.
 
I stopped scrolling halfway through page 2 but just leaving it as Molten Gold Mustard sauce would cover all the bases. It's mustardy and it's a sauce. 
 
As someone with treenut, peanut, shellfish and coconut allergies and whos children have gluten and dairy allergies that kind of labeling is really important to me. I get lots of anxiety determining if something is safe for us. (especially if at a restaurant or fast food)
 
Many products I have passed over because they just labelled some the ingredients as "natural ingredients" (not saying you did it here but voicing as a consumer with allergies) but a lot of things can fall into that category. Like that artificial raspberry flavoring from a beavers anus gland. Vague means not going to chance it. 0.02 
 

salsalady

Business Member
Sam & Oliver said:
I love you guys.

How many beers of I owe each of you now?

attachicon.gif
IMG_9079.PNG
 
updated label
 
 
 No Beers.  Just a couple re-wines and we're all good!  :cheers:
 
But I'm still gonna post what-ev's  about the labels you post and I am pleased that you take the comments and make your own decisions. 
 
D3monic said:
I stopped scrolling halfway through page 2 but just leaving it as Molten Gold Mustard sauce would cover all the bases. It's mustardy and it's a sauce. 
 
As someone with treenut, peanut, shellfish and coconut allergies and whos children have gluten and dairy allergies that kind of labeling is really important to me. I get lots of anxiety determining if something is safe for us. (especially if at a restaurant or fast food)
 
Many products I have passed over because they just labelled some the ingredients as "natural ingredients" (not saying you did it here but voicing as a consumer with allergies) but a lot of things can fall into that category. Like that artificial raspberry flavoring from a beavers anus gland. Vague means not going to chance it. 0.02 
Allergen Alerts are super important, and I learned that coconuts are part of that equation.  I've not used anything cocont and did not pay any attention to any of that.  Now I know, and will pay attention. 

PS- how is "smoked salt" made?
by putting salt in a pan in an off-set smoker set up.... where the burning wood chips infuse the salt crystals with smoke flavor....same thing as a smoker or meat on a grill or how liquid smoke is made.  I wonder how many carcinogens are lurking in that "smoked salt"?
 
It's a new product so probably has not been tested. 
 
Smoked salt is a smoked ingredient. Surface area is infused with smoke

Liquid smoke is condensed moisture collected from the inside of a smoker. There's a huge difference - rhe smoked salt never touches the carbonized walls of the smoker - liquid smoke is condensed against it and collected.

Hurl.


Back to the label, I agree with THP that it needs to say "spicy" somewhere on it.
I meant to say something earlier but forgot fo do so.

Not "hot" - just "spicy" - it describes any level of heat. IMO you must inform the consumer that it has hot peppers in it.

Some people are incredibly heat averse and highly sensitive. I would consider the inclusion of "spicy" as important as nuts or gluten.

It also opens the door for you to create different heat levels of this product. You can label this one "mild" or "very mild" - and then later make a medium & hot and maybe extra hot versions.
:cheers:
 
ok serious note here.  I can't see where to put the word "spicy" in the romance panel.  I have limited space, which means that something would have to come out to make spicy fit, physically within its constraints.
 
What if "Spicy" was stylized on the label graphic?
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
Molten Gold™ is a spicy, sweet, and tangy mustard sauce influenced by South Carolina barbecue. Use Molten Gold to bring out the absolute best in your pulled pork and grilled chicken or use it as a delicious dipping sauce.
 
Molten Gold™ is a sweet & tangy mustard sauce with a touch of heat, influenced by South Carolina barbecue. Use Molten Gold to bring out the absolute best in your pulled pork and grilled chicken or use it as a delicious dipping sauce.
 

salsalady

Business Member
okay, if you've been counting your grey hairs, you have way worse OCD than we thought!  :lol:
 
 
For the new sauce-
:dance:  :woohoo:   :onfire:  :party:  :party:  :cheers:  :clap:  :clap:  
 
 
 
 
that should about do it~  :D

PS- it looks good, the sauce color works with the label colors, like the name and the description says what it it in 3 words "mustard bbq sauce".....WIN!
 

The Hot Pepper

Founder
Admin
A little red pepper icon in a circle type icon top left of the name, something like that could work. A simple little icon to say this is a spicy product. And to see how spicy you have your meter.

Remember, spicy = sales. People are into the heat these days. Take a nod from Wendy's, Doritos, etc.

But still it looks great! When it's on the shelf and I see that pepper though, I am going to yours first.
 
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