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The bonnets got me, took them to be too tame!

With a scorvile of just 350k I threw two in a curry last night, all was good. Yes a bit of a kick but it was a good hot curry at the end. Shot of milk done.

However, this morning after washing my hand (I neglected the glove, "only two small bonnets" opps!) a few times.. rub my eye slight burn wash my hands again. Starting to wish I worn the gloves at this point. I've then proceeded to doings some labouring work and well it must have pushed the capsaicin into the pores of my skin, the hand I held the chillies with is currently on fire, ongoing 4 hours!!! Rubbing alcohol, milk, hand wash nothings going to stop it. 

Anyone been here before, how long am I waiting for this to go? The best I could find is up to 16 hours... that'll drag on! 
 
I was turning all my peppers into powder, mainly ghosts. While slicing them in have I must have pierced my glove and hadn't noticed. About half hour after getting them into my electric smoker my left hand thumb area felt like an acid burn.
Was intense and lasted for hours. Only relief was soaking in a cup of cold milk, but the second I removed it, it flared up again.
Two days later I could suck my thumb and still get heat from it.
 
Peppers are no joke. Even cooking and cleaning pans from making hot sauce can cause gags.
 

Harry_Dangler

Extreme Member
I've been processing superhot pods for seed on/off for the last month.  Double gloved.  The ends of my fingers burn constantly.  Not bad but just uncomfortable.  It usually stays this way for me until mid October.  If any gets in your eyes .... it's horrific .... especially if you wear contacts.  It can be bad on body parts too.  Drachor is right .... cutting boards, knifes, bowls, Sharpie markers ..... etc. are all transferers of the evil.  
 
I've got a chilli box with various items in it already and then a separate blender and my profession being a Chef at the moment even with the countless hours of practise from preventing cross contamination, chillies still seem to slip the net. I think its because its physical and goes beyond a bacterial transfer from place to place. You can 't just kill it with the magic spray and it persists for a long time. Probably having to degrade naturally, opposed to waiting on it to die.
 

ahayastani

Extreme Member
Capsaicin does not dissolve well in water, which makes that it will stick easily to surfaces. Rinsing with water won't help. Water with soap is better but not terribly good :) Milk helps because it contains fats which dissolve the capsaicin, but like soap, it is not terribly good... I clean cooking utensils immediately after use, to avoid penetration of capsaicin as much as possible. 
 
In my case, working with chiles hurts the most when I'm cooking, and some water vapor escapes lifting the lid... If it hurts so much that I can't tolerate it any more, I continually wash my hands with washing powder under a stream of cold water.
 
based on everything said, I would think warm milk may be the solution for capsaicin in the skin, as cold milk would close the pores more and prevent it from getting to the spice but this a very big guess  :shh:
 
ChilliPep23 said:
based on everything said, I would think warm milk may be the solution for capsaicin in the skin, as cold milk would close the pores more and prevent it from getting to the spice but this a very big guess  :shh:
Milk on the skin wont really do much. Mechanic's soap I find works the best. Never had an issue with Worx or Lava bars not getting it off. 
 
Burning and numb fingers are things I expect and yet they still catch me unexpectedly from time to time. In autumn it seems like I always have a bit of burn somewhere.

I usually wear gloves but still.

I've washed my hands 3 times in a row with soap and then dried them and licked my fingers and they were still piquant.

Acetone needs to be handled with care but can remove large amounts of capsaicin from skin rapidly and acetone is strongly water soluble. I keep some on hand just in case but haven't had to use it.
 
If you're gong to use a solvent, don't use acetone on your hands repeatedly. Especially if you don't know the purity of it. The big box stores have so many contaminants inside the acetone's they sell. I have seen containers of acetone be contaminated with DMSO. A little wont hurt you, but don't get into a habit of thinking it's ok to wash your hands with questionable solvents.
 
Demented said:
If you're gong to use a solvent, don't use acetone on your hands repeatedly.
That's understanding as well.
It's not safe and and even comes with some serious risks.

I suspect corn oil might work but haven't tested it.

I used dirt earlier today. Literally rubbed my fingers in it scrubbing hard and then washed it away with the hose. It works better than most bar and hand soaps but probably not better than mechanics soaps like Lava etc.
 
50/50 dish soap and at least 60% alcohol hand sanitizer and a soft nail brush. Scrub for 30 to 45 seconds . Rinse with warm water. Lick fingers to see if it is gone. Repeat as necessary. Works wonders.
 
I must be a masochist.
 
I actually like to be liking the burn on my hands.
 
After slicing and dicing chiles.
 
But I'm crazy.
 
That way.
 
Max Nihil said:
That's understanding as well.
It's not safe and and even comes with some serious risks.

I suspect corn oil might work but haven't tested it.

I used dirt earlier today. Literally rubbed my fingers in it scrubbing hard and then washed it away with the hose. It works better than most bar and hand soaps but probably not better than mechanics soaps like Lava etc.
Lab/food grade acetone would be no issue really. You'd just mostly suffer dry hands. 

Sesame oil would work better than the corn, but it doesn't get it all off. 
 
texas blues said:
You haven't lived.
 
Until your significant other screams at you.
 
For having burning hot stuff on your mouth.
 
And your fingers.
 
While having seckshul relations.
Then it happens enough times that she requests it. "Eat something spicy but not TOO spicy."
 
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