• Do you need help identifying a 🌢?
    Is your plant suffering from an unknown issue? 🀧
    Then ask in Identification and Diagnosis.

powder-flake What pepper to use for sweet Paprika powder??

Good afternoon.
I see lots of paprika powder for sale. The one thing I do not find is seeds of "Paprika" or "Paprica" for sale.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
 
Good afternoon.
I see lots of paprika powder for sale. The one thing I do not find is seeds of "Paprika" or "Paprica" for sale.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
I have done more searching here in Argentina. Two vendors sell seed for paprica. The two fruits looks completely different.
Are there many kinds of Paprica?
 
Making paprika is a lot of fun, every year I make different types and then I make blends πŸ™‚ The only one I buy is oak smoked from Spain, because they don't use smokers here.

Some peppers lend themselves well to use, others lose their organoleptic components.

20230926_095605.jpg.2fb48a1d2899b30752dae50bea209472.jpg
20230926_094936.jpg.96c78fdeeadc84eb9a46543e27b9e497.jpg
20231107_193757.jpg.48c88b95624c538e0dd3678cc1fa1a65.jpg
20231120_175550.jpg.b3592e8dd30a2f072f91b27a9452a4c6.jpg
20231122_123836.jpg.0da64bcd6c0c38026c08db859c27277c.jpg
 
I forgot some things πŸ™ƒ
I understand that calling a pepper "paprika" can lead to different results, as paprika (which has the same etimology as piper/pepper) is most commonly the end product of drying different cultivars. Spain and Hungary have excellent paprikas.
I suggest you grow different bell peppers and hot peppers (C. annuum), and make a blend based on the degree of sweetness you prefer.
I recommend the Gorria cultivar (often mislabeled as Piment d'Espelette, which is a geographic designation).
Furthermore, the Bishop's crown among the C. Baccatum produces an excellent powder.
However, the best chili peppers for this use have thin skin, while juicy or thick ones are difficult to dry.
 
Last edited:
I forgot some things πŸ™ƒ
I understand that calling a pepper "paprika" can lead to different results, as paprika (which has the same etimology as piper/pepper) is most commonly the end product of drying different cultivars. Spain and Hungary have excellent paprikas.
I suggest you grow different bell peppers and hot peppers (C. annuum), and make a blend based on the degree of sweetness you prefer.
I recommend the Gorria cultivar (often mislabeled as Piment d'Espelette, which is a geographic designation).
Furthermore, the Bishop's crown among the C. Baccatum produces an excellent powder.
However, the best chili peppers for this use have thin skin, while juicy or thick ones are difficult to dry.

I forgot some things πŸ™ƒ
I understand that calling a pepper "paprika" can lead to different results, as paprika (which has the same etimology as piper/pepper) is most commonly the end product of drying different cultivars. Spain and Hungary have excellent paprikas.
I suggest you grow different bell peppers and hot peppers (C. annuum), and make a blend based on the degree of sweetness you prefer.
I recommend the Gorria cultivar (often mislabeled as Piment d'Espelette, which is a geographic designation).
Furthermore, the Bishop's crown among the C. Baccatum produces an excellent powder.
However, the best chili peppers for this use have thin skin, while juicy or thick ones are difficult to dry.
Thank you very much. Now I also understand. Great stuff.
Greetings from Argentina
 
I forgot some things πŸ™ƒ
I understand that calling a pepper "paprika" can lead to different results, as paprika (which has the same etimology as piper/pepper) is most commonly the end product of drying different cultivars. Spain and Hungary have excellent paprikas.
I suggest you grow different bell peppers and hot peppers (C. annuum), and make a blend based on the degree of sweetness you prefer.
I recommend the Gorria cultivar (often mislabeled as Piment d'Espelette, which is a geographic designation).
Furthermore, the Bishop's crown among the C. Baccatum produces an excellent powder.
However, the best chili peppers for this use have thin skin, while juicy or thick ones are difficult to dry.
So does this mean I can use the Lesya pepper for a base, & then use Scotch Bonnet for the heat?
 
Last edited:
Two of my favorite commercially sold sweet paprika powders are Spanish pimenton de la vera dulce (Bola and Jaranda peppers) and Hongarian Szeged sweet paprika powder (Kapia) Last year i made some powder from Piquillo de lodosa Post in thread 'Sulsa's 2023 Glog' https://thehotpepper.com/threads/sulsas-2023-glog.76492/post-1774336 That stuff was the sweetest i ever tasted!!!
I read an article once from a agricultural company in Serbia, they were trying to come up with a cross between Kapia and Piquillo de Lodosa to enlarge the fleshy bulk of the sweet pepper Kapia. They said that the more skin and placenta tissue is ground with the powder the lighter the color and the more bitter the taste became.
As suggested above, making some mixtures of different types of peppers could make some awesome powder!
 
Last edited:
Two of my favorite commercially sold sweet paprika powders are Spanish pimenton de la vera dulce (Bola and Jaranda peppers) and Hongarian Szeged sweet paprika powder (Kapia) Last year i made some powder from Piquillo de lodosa Post in thread 'Sulsa's 2023 Glog' https://thehotpepper.com/threads/sulsas-2023-glog.76492/post-1774336 That stuff was the sweetest i ever tasted!!!
I read an article once from a agricultural company in Serbia, they were trying to come up with a cross between Kapia and Piquillo de Lodosa to enlarge the fleshy bulk of the sweet pepper Kapia. They said that the more skin and placenta tissue is ground with the powder the lighter the color and the more bitter the taste became.
As suggested above, making some mixtures of different types of peppers could make some awesome powder!
I am now harvesting some peppers here.
I will seperate and dry what I can. The main harvest time will be in April to June.
I am looking forward to the results of mixes. I litaraly do not have any sweet varieties exept some yellow bell peppers. All will have at least some heat.
The powder we made last year was a mix of all we had and there is still lots left. Very nice stuff.
This year there is more variety but next season, If I live, is going to be wild.
 
This is the way to make fine powders like store bought.
I love the steep learning curve for me here in THP. I also baught some seeds from @RobStar, paisano from South Africa. It still has a long way to travel but apparrently its on the way for the first leg to my brother on the South African west coast. I feel like a child on Christmas morning. Long wait. At least the Chile Rayado is on the list.
 
pimenton de la vera dulce
exactly πŸ™‚
Kapia and Piquillo de Lodosa
you convinced me right away! added to the (already endless) 2025 list 🫑
And I'll try to dry-roast some pepper (no kettle grill here)

Does anyone know if there is a method I can use inside the house to give those 5 minutes of smoking on woods (without the neighbors calling the firefighters)?
a method that addresses the issue of thicker skinned and harder to dry peppers when making paprika - DaQatz fine powder method
Nice one! Maybe I would have some doubts about the flavor following steaming compared to other methods, but who knows? we need a comparison! Personally, I solve the problem of peppers with thick skins by cutting them finely before dehydrating them.

I would also like to try dehydrating the juicy C. frutescens (in this case I would exclude steaming; I don't know about roasting)
 
exactly πŸ™‚

you convinced me right away! added to the (already endless) 2025 list 🫑
And I'll try to dry-roast some pepper (no kettle grill here)

Does anyone know if there is a method I can use inside the house to give those 5 minutes of smoking on woods (without the neighbors calling the firefighters)?

Nice one! Maybe I would have some doubts about the flavor following steaming compared to other methods, but who knows? we need a comparison! Personally, I solve the problem of peppers with thick skins by cutting them finely before dehydrating them.

I would also like to try dehydrating the juicy C. frutescens (in this case I would exclude steaming; I don't know about roasting)
I am going to try the method the people here in latin America use over some coals on a mesh. The Chile Rayado gets dried over a three day period with constantly tending the fire by adding some coals. I will also try to use my cold smoker, but with some coals for heat.
Once I have done some I will post results.
 
Does anyone know if there is a method I can use inside the house to give those 5 minutes of smoking on woods (without the neighbors calling the firefighters)?

I often smoke some salmon for my fettucine con salmone in my "smokerpan" simply on my stove in the kitchen.
It's just a ordinary metal pan with a steambasket and a lid. I put in some aluminiumfoil and pour in some fine wooddust.
I panfry the salmon first and after that i put it in the steambasket and put the pan on high heat untill the first smoke comes out. After the first smoke i turn down the heat to minimal and let it smoke for a few minutes. Make sure to put your extractor hood on full power just in case some smoke leaks out. This would work great on peppers as well! The pan itself is never really cleaned actually... i can use the smokedust in the foil 3 to 4 times and when the wooddust all turns black or if i had some water or fat leak into the wooddust i simply throw out the foil and put in a new liner.
The steambasket and lid is washed every time so no creosote can build up on the part that touches food.
Sometimes i don't put in wooddust but brown sugar mixed with star anise and dried mandarin skin. This makes for some killer glazed chinese mandarin chickenwings! :D

IMG_20240331_201308.jpg
IMG_20240331_201228.jpg
 
Last edited:
The best paprika (pimenton) I have ever had (and used last night in my baked beans) is Castillo by Ranch Gordo:
The peppers are smoke-dried in Spain (it's reminiscent of a chipotle power, but the flavor is deeper and richer) and it's a blend of Jaranda and Jariza peppers. 100% recommended. Would love to try some if anyone here makes it. 😁
 
Back
Top