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Yelanfam Farms 2019 GLOG

This year I decided I wanted to bulk up my garden and turn it into a hopefully marketable garden. I've bought a rack and lights, seed trays, seed cells, dirt, seeds, weed barrier, shade cloth, and probably more stuff I'm forgetting.
 
I've probably been given or traded for around half of my pepper seeds. One great person on reddit sent me a huge pack or seeds and I am forever thankful for. A few others on reddit sent me a couple as well. I offered them hot sauce that I made and is finally ready to ship this week. I got here on THP a little late this year, but all ready I have made a few trades with some great people.
 
I have bought from White Hot Peppers, Lawrence Family Farms, Burpee, Baker Creek, Sow True Seeds, MIGardener I'm sure I'm forgetting some other places.
 
My plan is to do rows of 25 feet, and have 4, 25 x 25 foot blocks. Most of that peppers, the rest tomatoes cucumbers and beans. I'll also have a bigger section for corn and melons including the Bradford Family Watermelon that I'm super excited about.
 
I started propagating on January 21, 2019.
My first seedlings appeared on  January 26, 2019.
I up potted the first batch on February 6, 2019.
 
But on to the peppers, this is my current list of what I have.
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Here is a pic of how I start them. I do multiple seeds in an 18 cell tray. It makes it easier to manage at first until I can get out into the greenhouse that I still have to build.
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You can see how I use wooden popsicle sticks to hold my labels. I've since changed to includ how many seeds are in the cell as well as tray number on the label.
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The Cherry Bombs were the first to pop up.
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Brazilian Starfish coming on strong.
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The Yellow Moruga Scorpion has a Tri Cotyledon, I actlly had about 4 of this from this pack of seeds.
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So far I have about a third of them up potted to 36 cell trays.
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Still got a long way to go. I'll be propagating my tomatoes tomorrow. Hoping for a great summer garden this year!
 
***Bonus here is some pics of the early seed test I did. These were propagated on December 27, 2018.
 
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Why do you want to tarp your ground over the winter ??
 
 
FYI, in many states, a Nursery License is required to sell plants.
Inspectors show up at farmers markets looking for violators.
 
With limited space,
you might want to ditch the corn.
Think about GARLIC (soft neck) fall plant, spring harvest,
no scape, less labor.
At most markets, this sells out each and every time you bring it,
hundreds or a thousand or more heads.
 
Depending on your market, do a little research,
if there is a demand for it,  GINGER is highly profitable
in small spaces.
 
Selling anything is about presentation more,
than the actual product.
Those metal pans, are terrible,  no,  horrible
for displaying produce. 
Besides catching the sun and transmitting the heat
to the produce,  
more importantly, it looks terrible to the consumer.
Be farmy,  wicker or wood, make it presentable,
more will sell.
Especially when you have limited amounts of produce,
make it look more with a better presentation.
 
Sam Walton said  "stack it high and watch it fly"
I'm sure you see that happen with larger produce
sellers at busy markets.
 
 
 
 
HungryJack said:
Why do you want to tarp your ground over the winter ??
 
 
FYI, in many states, a Nursery License is required to sell plants.
Inspectors show up at farmers markets looking for violators.
 
With limited space,
you might want to ditch the corn.
Think about GARLIC (soft neck) fall plant, spring harvest,
no scape, less labor.
At most markets, this sells out each and every time you bring it,
hundreds or a thousand or more heads.
 
Depending on your market, do a little research,
if there is a demand for it,  GINGER is highly profitable
in small spaces.
 
Selling anything is about presentation more,
than the actual product.
Those metal pans, are terrible,  no,  horrible
for displaying produce. 
Besides catching the sun and transmitting the heat
to the produce,  
more importantly, it looks terrible to the consumer.
Be farmy,  wicker or wood, make it presentable,
more will sell.
Especially when you have limited amounts of produce,
make it look more with a better presentation.
 
Sam Walton said  "stack it high and watch it fly"
I'm sure you see that happen with larger produce
sellers at busy markets.
 
 
 
 
The tarp is to kill all the weeds, plants sells aren't really a focus for me. The pans were all I had at the time, I wanted to make small wooden crates but didn't have time. I have plenty of room for corn, just don't want to deal will all the weeds. I would like to do garlic, but I think it's too hot here for it.
 
 
Hawkins said:
 
The tarp is to kill all the weeds, plants sells aren't really a focus for me. The pans were all I had at the time, I wanted to make small wooden crates but didn't have time. I have plenty of room for corn, just don't want to deal will all the weeds. I would like to do garlic, but I think it's too hot here for it.
 
 
Understood about the weeds,
but its probably a bad idea to tarp.
You are going to allow salts to build up on your grow plots,
as you are not allowing the winter rains to help wash these salts
deeper into the soil.
You are basically replicating a green house or high tunnel situation.
After a few years, those growing in the ground with conventional fertilizers
find their soil becoming overwhelmed with salt.
 
You can grow garlic in the south.
Want to use SOFT neck varieties, 
not hard neck.
Put the seed stock/bulbs in the fridge for 8 weeks
before planting time.
 
If you have a local market for it,
GINGER is highly profitable as well for small plots.
 
If you have some mexican restaurants in the area,
check behind them, Jalapenos come packed in wood
crates from some areas, work for produce display.
 
Problem with corn is, 
needs to be block planted for decent pollination and ear development,
and it has a 5-8 day shelf life in the field once ripe.
So if your corn is ready this week and it rains over the weekend,
your corn might be starchy by the following weekend market.
Plus its a pain to succession plant small amounts.
 
Hawkins said:
I have officially broken even for the year. 
Congrats on covering your basic costs.
 
Might also want to consider the 
wear and tear on your vehicle to deliver and sell your produce.
Fuel for such trips.
 
Next, consider your hours invested in all this
and assign a value to your time doing this as a business.
Then consider how much more you have to grow in order
to generate this extra revenue to pay for your time,
and how many more hours need to be invested to accomplish this higher
amount of revenue, recalculate again with these additional hours invested.
 
Then consider how much you really value your time
and wether turning your hobby into a business is worth it,
or just growing a far less plants for fun is the more "profitable" choice.
 
saiias said:
Nice hawkins. Congrats. Does that include all the long term hardware costs too? If yes, you are in a good position for next year.

Sent from my SM-G973U1 using Tapatalk
 
Yeah for the most part, I'll probably buy more weed barrier, and drip lines, but thats not required. The only thing I need to buy for next year is dirt to start seeds, and a small selection of seeds, also fertilizer for the fertigation system.
 

PaulG

Extreme Member
HungryJack said:
Congrats on covering your basic costs.
 
Might also want to consider the 
wear and tear on your vehicle to deliver and sell your produce.
Fuel for such trips.
 
Next, consider your hours invested in all this
and assign a value to your time doing this as a business.
Then consider how much more you have to grow in order
to generate this extra revenue to pay for your time,
and how many more hours need to be invested to accomplish this higher
amount of revenue, recalculate again with these additional hours invested.
 
Then consider how much you really value your time
and wether turning your hobby into a business is worth it,
or just growing a far less plants for fun is the more "profitable" choice.
Good points, Jack. Not sure if it's applicable to most of us,
since there is no way to pay for the cost of this 'hobby' 
unless one grows on a large scale. I suspect Hawk has
considered these things more than once.
 
Sure would like to see a grow log to see how you
set things up, both growing and marketing. 
 
PaulG said:
Good points, Jack. Not sure if it's applicable to most of us,
since there is no way to pay for the cost of this 'hobby' 
unless one grows on a large scale. I suspect Hawk has
considered these things more than once.
 
Sure would like to see a grow log to see how you
set things up, both growing and marketing. 
 
I'm nowhere near what I would consider large scale, I would love to be on day. I'm lucky enough to have land passed down through the family, and got to experience my grandpaw teaching me how to grow. All though he never had the irrigation system like I do, nor did he grow to sell.

It's a nice hobby to pass the time, and if I make some money at it then it's worth it.
 
Also I've finally started drying and grinding some pods, should be offering a small quantity of powders soon. The plan is a super hot blend, and a smoked Aji Busla De Dulce(I love this pepper, got it from a member here, and will be forever thankful).
 
 
PaulG said:
Good points, Jack. Not sure if it's applicable to most of us,
since there is no way to pay for the cost of this 'hobby' 
unless one grows on a large scale. I suspect Hawk has
considered these things more than once.
 
Sure would like to see a grow log to see how you
set things up, both growing and marketing. 
 
Large scale might just give you the opportunity
for the hobby to cost even more. :)
 
Wish I had the time for growlogs.
Plus I destroy or lose camera's when I bring them into the field
or on the tractors. Top of the tractor tire is always the quick spot
to place a camera for a minute while you do something,
then forget, and run it over  :rolleyes:

This year, we had about 65 acres of peppers, about 320,000 plants,
150 acres of tomatoes, another 100 acres of melons and other veg,
10 acres native plants(weeds) for seed production for a government contract,
used for restoration projects.
150 acres pumpkins, 100 acres sweet corn,
800 acres field corn, 500 acres soy beans.
 
Just a tiny bit busy at times  :)
 

PaulG

Extreme Member
HungryJack said:
 
Large scale might just give you the opportunity
for the hobby to cost even more. :)
 
Wish I had the time for growlogs.
Plus I destroy or lose camera's when I bring them into the field
or on the tractors. Top of the tractor tire is always the quick spot
to place a camera for a minute while you do something,
then forget, and run it over  :rolleyes:
This year, we had about 65 acres of peppers, about 320,000 plants,
150 acres of tomatoes, another 100 acres of melons and other veg,
10 acres native plants(weeds) for seed production for a government contract,
used for restoration projects.
150 acres pumpkins, 100 acres sweet corn,
800 acres field corn, 500 acres soy beans.
 
Just a tiny bit busy at times  :)
Okay, thats a significant grow. Where do you
market/sell pods from 320,000 plants? I would think
large scale canners or food processors?
 
HungryJack said:
 
Large scale might just give you the opportunity
for the hobby to cost even more. :)
 
Wish I had the time for growlogs.
Plus I destroy or lose camera's when I bring them into the field
or on the tractors. Top of the tractor tire is always the quick spot
to place a camera for a minute while you do something,
then forget, and run it over  :rolleyes:
This year, we had about 65 acres of peppers, about 320,000 plants,
150 acres of tomatoes, another 100 acres of melons and other veg,
10 acres native plants(weeds) for seed production for a government contract,
used for restoration projects.
150 acres pumpkins, 100 acres sweet corn,
800 acres field corn, 500 acres soy beans.
 
Just a tiny bit busy at times  :)
If you ever find yourself an inexpensive camera, I'd still be interested in some pics. That's a large scale in everyone's book... I think.
 
Anyone know the market for SFRB of Pecans? My great grandpaw planted 4 trees 50years ago, and they are absolutely loaded this year.
o2XXACm.jpg

Joking, I just wanted to show these off, but if anyone really wanted some, I could send some out.
 
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