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#21 boutros

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 01:03 AM

Yeah, usually called king fish in FLA.

Surprised Sum said mackerel.


Cool. I was picturing smoked pacific mackerel for a second, lol

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#22 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 01:09 AM

I love somoked king fish. It makes an awesome dip. You puree it with sour cream and cream cheese. Serve with crackers.

Okay, back to rubs.

#23 QuadShotz

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 05:52 AM

Awwww, and here I thought this was the thai massage thread... :(

#24 LUCKYDOG

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 07:54 AM

Raw sugar has a higher burn point than regular sugar and doesnt cake up

#25 SumOfMyBits

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 05:11 PM

Atlantic Spanish Mackerel... some peeps tend to think it is a bit oily/fatty. I think it's great smoked. This fish has enough flavor to handle a bit more spice. I'm thinking the next rub on this fish will include powdered orange hab in place of the cayenne.

#26 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 05:47 PM

I like king mackerel. Thought that's what you meant. Popular down in FL.

#27 Ballzworth

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 07:02 PM

thanks for posting. I'll be trying that out later this season. yet another great use for hot peppers to add to the fridge. from your experience, what percentage approx. does the base account for in the overall mix?

#28 SumOfMyBits

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 08:20 PM

Ahhhhhhh Dammmn... Looks like I made it onto the boss' signature. Not sure if that is a good omen or not.

#29 Ashen

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 03:28 AM

part of the reason I like real apple juice in my cider mop is the sugars in it help to develope the bark as well.

MMMM bark :)

#30 patrick

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Posted 28 August 2009 - 09:19 AM

Here's a bit about Iggy's "clay salt". http://www.google.co...ztrWSTJrQonUqaA

Figures he spelled it wrong.:P
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#31 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 29 August 2009 - 05:04 PM

thanks for posting. I'll be trying that out later this season. yet another great use for hot peppers to add to the fridge. from your experience, what percentage approx. does the base account for in the overall mix?


When I speak of a base I am speaking of a foundation that you build on, not a dominant ingredient or flavor. Like the mirepoix of the spice world. When it comes to rubs I like to start with a base. This is a base that will pretty much work with whatever rub you are making. Earthy flavors that go well together and season well without standing out in the front. Onion, garlic, celery, peppers... (what you like). I find that if you don't start with a base you end up with a spice blend instead of a rub. Perfect your base and then create your rub from there. Naga rub, or whatever you like. Once you have your proven base you'll be making all kinds of rubs, and quickly. Hey, this is just the way I do it.

#32 Blister

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 11:41 PM

Ahhhhhhh Dammmn... Looks like I made it onto the boss' signature. Not sure if that is a good omen or not.


I honestly dunno, but it looks like he's got his meat rubs down to a science though... :shocked: ;)

#33 Ballzworth

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 11:53 PM

Perfect your base and then create your rub from there. Naga rub, or whatever you like.


sounds good. I guess, from inexperience, I wasn't sure the amount of base vs. the other ingredients I should consider, or if there was a common suggestion of how much the base should make of the final mix. By the sounds of it I should perfect the base which is probably the vast majority of the mix, and add to it accordingly based on my own preference. sound about right?

I'll be experimenting shortly. Thanks

#34 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 12:00 AM

sounds good. I guess, from inexperience, I wasn't sure the amount of base vs. the other ingredients I should consider, or if there was a common suggestion of how much the base should make of the final mix. By the sounds of it I should perfect the base which is probably the vast majority of the mix, and add to it accordingly based on my own preference. sound about right?

I'll be experimenting shortly. Thanks


That sounds about right. Put it like this. Your base for pork (ribs, etc.) will be the same every time. You can make different pork rubs with different flavors, but the base will be the same. Now for chicken you may want to change the base... and so on. Or your base may work for all meats. Depends on what you use. Again, this is just the way I end up doing it. A base first. The base may be slightly adjusted for different meats but for many the same base works since it's basic seasonings.

#35 Blister

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 12:06 AM

I'm not sure what you are saying about dominant ingredient/flavors. To me, the base is the ingredient/flavor your build on. For example, when you are making a spaghetti sauce (about the only thing I can really compare to), your base or dominant ingredient would be the one you fry with the meat. In my case I love the flavor that is brought out when you fry the meat with garlic and oregano. You can really taste these when you finish the sauce, but that's not all you taste. You also get a flavor melody that includes a variety of other spices that have been added throughout the cooking process. These usually include the more subtle flavors like onion, thyme and coriander. Which, to me, bring out other ingredient flavors.

I like the flavors to roll across my tongue as the dish is eaten, but maybe this is what you were talking about all along though :think:

#36 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 12:11 AM

The base is the foundation but does not always end up being the dominant flavor. You may only taste hints of the base. But they are the base for the other flavors, so everything melds. Soups and stews start with the flavor base mirepoix. It adds to the overall flavor, but it is not dominant. It is not the dominant ingredient either. That's what I tried to clarify when I compared it to mirepoix. It's a starting flavor base, not a dominant ingredient or flavor.

#37 Ballzworth

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 01:01 AM

The base is the foundation but does not always end up being the dominant flavor. You may only taste hints of the base. But they are the base for the other flavors, so everything melds. It's a starting flavor base, not a dominant ingredient or flavor.


thanks for the advice. I'll be getting on that as soon as possible to try it out. I make many hot sauces so I'm eager to try out some new items that I haven't done before.

#38 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 01:07 AM

I knew base would confuse people. I hope I've explained it :)

#39 The Hot Pepper

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 01:35 PM

Awhile back I mentioned I was experimenting with rubs.

I've got a new rub for brisket. It's Sumatra coffee beans, chipotle, brown sugar, onion, garlic, dried Kaffir lime leaf, and salt (not in that order) all pulverized to a fine powder. You get all kinds of hits from this that are perfect for brisket. I'll use another pepper as well to kick it up and may tweak it, and I will attempt the actual brisket soon with pics. Mmmmmmm brisket.

I call this rub Brisket Buzz™.

#40 JayT

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Posted 11 July 2010 - 01:43 PM

Well that sounds great. Where do you find Kaffir Lime Leaves? I have looked for them fresh for Asian cooking and have never found them. Looking forward to some brisket pics.




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