preservation First pickling experience. What did I do wrong?

Ok so I pickled all of my Jalapenos and Hungarian Wax Peppers. I just pulled the top off and they do not taste right.

Here is what I did. I used regular old white vinegar and got it up to a boil. I put a jar in the microwave with just a little bit of water and got the bottle hot. I poured the peppers in it and then poured the boiling vinegar over peppers. I then cut up some Cilantro and put in it and put a dash or two of salt. Closed the jar tight and put it in the refrigirator.

Now about 3 weeks later I opened it up and they do not taste right. I can still taste a good amount of vinegar and they hardly have any pepper flavor. What did I screw up?
 
Sounds like way too much vinegar. Your main ingredient should be water, not vinegar.
 
there are some pickling recipes here do a search! I havent pickled but as THP said it sounds like toooooo much vinegar
 
thehotpepper.com said:
Sounds like way too much vinegar. Your main ingredient should be water, not vinegar.

Hmm maybe so. I thought it was the other way around, about 80% vinegar 20% water.

Damnit.

Can I fix the ones I have by dumping out some vinegar or did I screw them up.
 
pickling should have some salt in it also, try these (not my originals):

Pickled Habanero Chillies
To insure the best pickled chillies, choose only the freshest ones and those with no blemishes. Bruised fruits will produce "mushy" chillies. You can also soak the chillies overnight in a brine of 3 cups water and 1 cup pickling salt to crisp them before pickling. Be sure to rinse them well to remove excess salt before processing. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
• 3 dozen fresh habanero chillies or enough to fill the jars
• 2 sterilized pint jars
• Pickling Solution:
• 3 cups 5 to 6 percent distilled white vinegar
• 3 cups water
• 1 ½ teaspoons pickling salt

1. Poke a couple of small holes in top of each chilli and pack them tightly in sterilized jars leaving 1/4-inch head space.
2. Combine the vinegar, water, and salt. Bring the solution to a boil and pour over the chillies. Remove trapped air bubbles by gently tapping on the sides of the jars. Add more of the pickling solution if needed; close the jars.
3. Store for 4 to 6 weeks before serving.

Yield: 2 pints
Heat Scale: Extremely Hot

Pickled Green Chilli
These chilli strips are great on sandwiches or when chopped and mixed with salads such as tuna or shrimp.
Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
• ½ cup white vinegar
• ½ cup sugar
• 1 teaspoon salt
• 1 teaspoon dill seed
• 1/2 teaspoon mustard seed
• 8 to 10 green New Mexico chillies, roasted and peeled, cut in strips (see chapter 2 for roasting and peeling instructions)
• 3 cloves garlic, cut in slivers

1. Combine the vinegar, sugar, and spices in a pan and simmer over low heat for 5 minutes.
2. Put the chilli into small, sterilized jars, cover with the liquid and add some garlic to each jar.
3. Cover tightly and refrigerate for 3 days before using.

Yield: 2 pints
Heat Scale: Medium.


"Traffic Light" Pickled Peppers
Brine:
step 1
• 3 cups water
• 1 cup pickling salt

1. Combine the salt and water and cover the chillies with the mixture.
2. Place a plate on the chillies to keep them submerged in the brine.
3. Soak the chillies overnight to crisp them. Drain, rinse well, and dry.

then
step 2

Pickling Solution:
• 3 cups water
• 3 cups 5 to 6 percent distilled white vinegar
• 3 teaspoons pickling salt

1. Poke a couple of small holes in top of each chilli and pack them tightly in sterilized jars leaving 1/4 inch headroom.
2. In a pan, combine the water, vinegar, and salt. Bring the solution to a boil and pour over the chillies, leaving no head space. Remove trapped air bubbles.
3. Store for 4 to 6 weeks in a cool, dark place before serving.

Yield: 4 pints
Heat Scale: Varies
 
when I have 'pickled' I used ordinary rock salt and just ground it up in a mortar and pestle to help it dissolve quicker.
 
Vinegar is solvent for capsaiscin so your chile's heat is now in the vinegar.

Throw them out and start over.
 
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