soil good easy potting soil

I am going to put some habs and red chilli's in containers this year.I only want to plant 5 or 6 containers and am looking for the best no hassle potting mix i can get.there has got to be something out there that i can go buy dump it in the buckets and add plants.something simple and easy.
any suggestions?I am in the south eastern michigan area if that helps with suggestions.
 
There are so many options. The ProMix BX is awesome, but you have to add your own nutrients. If you're not up for that, I'd contact your best local nursery and see what they've got for potting mix. Usually there is a top hand around there that can give you some good advice--like additional nutes needed down the road.

The local place here has stuff that is most peat moss but a tasty mix of earthworm castings, chicken manure, leaf compost and perlite. Awesome stuff--hopefully something like that is available in your area. I'd avoid the big box store stores products and go local. MHO.

Or, get tough, research some threads here, mix your own.... :cool:
 
There are so many options. The ProMix BX is awesome, but you have to add your own nutrients. If you're not up for that, I'd contact your best local nursery and see what they've got for potting mix. Usually there is a top hand around there that can give you some good advice--like additional nutes needed down the road.

The local place here has stuff that is most peat moss but a tasty mix of earthworm castings, chicken manure, leaf compost and perlite. Awesome stuff--hopefully something like that is available in your area. I'd avoid the big box store stores products and go local. MHO.

Or, get tough, research some threads here, mix your own.... :cool:


how do you add nutrients?
& is it necessary or a recommendatory?
 
how do you add nutrients?
& is it necessary or a recommendatory?

well,I went with what i was told should work at the local plant place.
I got pro mix but,not the pro mix bx cause they dont have.
the pro mix i got is in a gold bag and is made by premier horticulture.
looks like good stuff but i will need to add nutes in about 2 to 3 weeks according to the bag.

edited to add:
I did mix in worm casting with it when i filled the pots.
what else do i need to put in there?
 
Last season I used "Pro Gro Organic Fertilizer" which I applied biweekly. My peppers and tomatoes exploded in size with excellent structure and color. When you find something that really works you don't want to mess with it too much.

If you want to take a look at it here it is:
http://www.dirtworks.net/Organic-Fertilizer/Pro-Gro.html

Good luck!!
 
DudeThtsBad:
Most people start their peppers in small containers but you can certainly sew them direct. You probably won't get as high of a germination rate and their first few weeks will be key to what you wind up with in the fall. If you want to go with containers, you will need a special mix for your your peppers.

When looking for a soil mix for containers you should look for something that provides a lot of drainage and doesn't hold too much moisture. Many people prefer a bark or wood mulch based mix. Actually the mix has very little "soil" in it. It is what I am using this year after receiving a lot of advice online. I am very pleased with the results. A gentleman from another forum who has been growing peppers from seed for years recommends a 5-1-1 mix. It consists of 5 parts FINE ground pine or cedar mulch. 1 part Perlite and 1 part garden soil. The pine bark mulch might also be called cedar bark, cedar mulch, pine mulch or even Orchid bark. The Orchid bark should not be confused with "Orchid Mix". The mulch also should be quite finely ground as far as mulch goes. Basically, it should predominately be pieces smaller than a dime. It is usually quite inexpensive. The Perlite is also relatively inexpensive and helps with aeration and keeping the soil from compacting. The actual garden soil can be any garden soil as long as it is real "dirt". It is used to help the mix retain some moisture between waterings. You do not want to use straight garden soils and most people do not recommend Peat Moss based container mixes. For a low hassle solution, I do see a lot of people do recommend the ProMix BX, but it is not always available everywhere.

Add some Bone meal to the mix and whatever fertilizers you feel are appropriate. The 5-1-1 mix will have little nutrients for the peppers so a constant source is necessary. Some water weekly with a general chemical fertilizer and some prefer organic solutions.
 
DudeThtsBad:
Most people start their peppers in small containers but you can certainly sew them direct. You probably won't get as high of a germination rate and their first few weeks will be key to what you wind up with in the fall. If you want to go with containers, you will need a special mix for your your peppers.

When looking for a soil mix for containers you should look for something that provides a lot of drainage and doesn't hold too much moisture. Many people prefer a bark or wood mulch based mix. Actually the mix has very little "soil" in it. It is what I am using this year after receiving a lot of advice online. I am very pleased with the results. A gentleman from another forum who has been growing peppers from seed for years recommends a 5-1-1 mix. It consists of 5 parts FINE ground pine or cedar mulch. 1 part Perlite and 1 part garden soil. The pine bark mulch might also be called cedar bark, cedar mulch, pine mulch or even Orchid bark. The Orchid bark should not be confused with "Orchid Mix". The mulch also should be quite finely ground as far as mulch goes. Basically, it should predominately be pieces smaller than a dime. It is usually quite inexpensive. The Perlite is also relatively inexpensive and helps with aeration and keeping the soil from compacting. The actual garden soil can be any garden soil as long as it is real "dirt". It is used to help the mix retain some moisture between waterings. You do not want to use straight garden soils and most people do not recommend Peat Moss based container mixes. For a low hassle solution, I do see a lot of people do recommend the ProMix BX, but it is not always available everywhere.

Add some Bone meal to the mix and whatever fertilizers you feel are appropriate. The 5-1-1 mix will have little nutrients for the peppers so a constant source is necessary. Some water weekly with a general chemical fertilizer and some prefer organic solutions.

alriight sounds good. yeah im planting them in dixie cups now & i got black gold seeding mix, & ima add some of my bone meal !
 
The problem with the 5-1-1 mix is the pine bark ties up a lot of nitrogen while it is decomposing. If you are not careful the plants will not grow well at all. I use a similar mix in the past and added slow release granules and the plants just wouldn't grow. Switched to a liquid chemical fert nad the plants started growing again. I don't like to use the chemical ferts, so I do not use that mix anymore.

Promix is great, but too much money when you have to fill 100 pots. I can make my own for more than half the cost. For each 5 gal bucket, I use 2 gal Peat moss, 1 gal compost, 1 gal well composted pine bark fines, 1 gal perlite. I add about a 1/3 cup of pulverized dolomite lime, 1/2 cup tomato tone, and about 1 cup of worm castings. My plants are loving it.

The plants will love the worm castings, but I would add a slow release as well. I really love Espoma Tomato Tone personally, but there are several others that work well as well. 20 holes in the bottom should be plenty, although I usually ge a little bigger so they don't clog as easy. (3/8"-1/2") You could also drill a few in the side wall along the bottom if you see drainage is a problem.

Hope this helps!
jacob
 
The problem with the 5-1-1 mix is the pine bark ties up a lot of nitrogen while it is decomposing. If you are not careful the plants will not grow well at all. I use a similar mix in the past and added slow release granules and the plants just wouldn't grow. Switched to a liquid chemical fert nad the plants started growing again. I don't like to use the chemical ferts, so I do not use that mix anymore.

Promix is great, but too much money when you have to fill 100 pots. I can make my own for more than half the cost. For each 5 gal bucket, I use 2 gal Peat moss, 1 gal compost, 1 gal well composted pine bark fines, 1 gal perlite. I add about a 1/3 cup of pulverized dolomite lime, 1/2 cup tomato tone, and about 1 cup of worm castings. My plants are loving it.

The plants will love the worm castings, but I would add a slow release as well. I really love Espoma Tomato Tone personally, but there are several others that work well as well. 20 holes in the bottom should be plenty, although I usually ge a little bigger so they don't clog as easy. (3/8"-1/2") You could also drill a few in the side wall along the bottom if you see drainage is a problem.

Hope this helps!
jacob

thanks for the info.much appreciated.
 
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