annuum Mammoth Jalapeno

I'm growing these mammoths for the first time this year and it has a great taste and some nice kick to them. Here is a pic. I really like them red.

jalapeno.jpg
 
Working on some variegated Mammoth Jalapeno crosses as we speak. Some with a dab of poblano mixed in. Absolutely love those genetics. Pho is hands down the number one dish I'd put those in as well. You utter the words pho and my mouth instantly starts salivating.
 
@PollenNut Isn't Mammoth a hybrid? any idea as to its' parentage?
Show me a domesticated pepper that is not a hybrid or an unnatural selection by man.
Ace's and 8's.jpeg
This pepper for instance, has a chance to have variegated seedlings. I know this because I know what went into making it. When it comes to hybrids and origins... many are clouded in mystery as many are actually not made by man, but rather they are made with the help of insects. This is true for Chocolate Primotali, Wartryx, etc. Even the famed UFO has an uncertain beginning at Terra Time and Tide Nursery where it was found labeled as a simple Capsicum chinense 'UFO'. Knowing the parentage of a hybrid is nice, but you don't actually need to know the parentage to select good phenotypes to work forward. Selection is an ongoing process.
Bryan's Blood.jpeg
What is needed? If you know the parentage or the parental generations that are involved in your cross than you can look at those parents and decide which traits from each parent you utilize you might like to select for going forward. If you can see that trait, such as when I use a brown poblano to cross to my variegated poblanos... I can then select for two recessive traits in the f2. I know they are hidden there and I know how to go about getting those traits to express themselves. So, knowing the parental generations involved in the mating to get your f1 seed is important. But it isn't 100% needed. Again, we have countless hybrids created that no one truly knows the parents of.

Do I need to know the background of a pepper I am working with? Absolutely not. In many cases it is not known and if it is shared it is often wrong information to begin with. What I can count on as a hybridizer is the actual genes I can see being expressed in the phenotype of the hybrids I choose to work with. So for me, when I chose to work with Mammoth Jalapeno to create some variegated Jalapenos...
publanhalloween .jpeg
I did so because I liked what I could see and taste. I didn't base my crosses with that pepper based on some story about how it might have been created, but I would love to hear that story or stories if it has one to be shared. I love chocolate and I love variegation, so many of my variegated crosses hide the potential for both chocolate and variegation. I know this because I made them. I know the parents, but until it is proven I have no pudding to show. Show me the evidence. Chase what you love and make meaningful crosses based on what you can see expressed in the parental generation used to make your f1. Everything is shown in the parental generations you used to make your f1. Many things are hidden in the f1. In the f2 those treasures resurface. The trouble with unknown parents... you don't know what treasures to look for as you don't know what went into them. Many hybrids made by nature are not even recognized as hybrids until they are a generation or two into being made. By the way, I also love purple... so many of my hybrids in the early stages also exhibit some purple coloring. But back to your question, most peppers we see today are the result of man made selections over time. We may select for mendelian traits or non-mendelian traits. Quantitative traits are harder to select for as they take large grow outs to make meaningful selections. The larger the grow out the more meaningful the selections are. Mendelian traits, by contrast, can be ridiculously simple to select for if you are only going after one trait. The problem is it may be hard to find a plant that just has one trait you are desiring to add without carrying baggage with it that you may not want. A few peppers we see are actually made by Homo sapiens taking pollen in hand and putting that pollen on a receptive stigma. But yes, many more hybrids we see are the work of mother nature to begin with and our help in selecting different desirable phenotypes is done after the fact. If you want non-hybrid peppers that have not been tampered with or had man tamper with selecting phenotypes that are desirable then, and here is the real kicker and answer to your question, you will need to collect wild specimens and even then... be prepared as even in the wild peppers sometimes crossbreed. Long reply, but I hope you appreciate the effort put into giving you some information, even if it was not the exact flavor of information you were after.
 

Downriver

Extreme Member
...Long reply, but I hope you appreciate the effort put into giving you some information, even if it was not the exact flavor of information you were after.

Yepper, I do indeed appreciate you sharing your thoughts! I'm familiar with most of it, but it was good to read your views. In this case, SR's photo above doesn't strike me as the classic "jalapeno" shape. It looks like it suffers from Peyronie's, lol. Since you chose it to be a player in your breeding project, I thought you might be aware of Mammoth's parentage and, if so, I was curious as to what it was. Just that simple.
 
Yepper, I do indeed appreciate you sharing your thoughts! I'm familiar with most of it, but it was good to read your views. In this case, SR's photo above doesn't strike me as the classic "jalapeno" shape. It looks like it suffers from Peyronie's, lol. Since you chose it to be a player in your breeding project, I thought you might be aware of Mammoth's parentage and, if so, I was curious as to what it was. Just that simple.
This is the specific Mammoth pepper phenotype I'm working with. Keep that picture for future reference if you get any of my crosses with Mammoth Jalapeno in them. Capsicum in the background is also one of my creations.
mammoth1.jpeg
 
@PollenNut I almost diddnt recognize you with out the π’»π“π‘œπ“Œπ‘’π“‡π“Ž 𝓉𝑒𝓍𝓉 will it be coming back?
SOME THINGS WERE meant to be seen once and then never offered again. If you were lucky enough to get in on them in the beginning when the full force of the magic was being offered then consider yourself lucky. If you knew how to utilize that magic to come up with a plethora of unique and very beautiful phenotypes in the next generation I applaud you. But it is very simple if you simply plant enough seeds early on and make selections frequently and often till you have a manageable number of seedlings to grow out then you will 100% see the magic in any seed I offer.
 

MikeUSMC

Extreme Member
Found a pic of a Mammoth JalapeΓ±o I grew a couple of years ago:
796A85F0-F067-4625-8DA8-D97CAC2F1A29.jpeg


I remember it being absolutely delicious but taking FOREVER to ripen! Worth the wait though, because they’re definitely better red 😁
 

MikeUSMC

Extreme Member
Now there's a mammoth beast how did it taste compared to a regular Jala Mike?
Wish I could tell you, @talas, but I haven’t eaten enough different (red/ripe) jalapeΓ±o strains to accurately compare one to another, sorry! I remember it being sweet, but not packing as much of a (heat) punch as I would’ve hoped. Tasty pepper though!
 
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